Book Review | Girl Squads: 20 Female Friendships That Changed History by Sam Maggs

Authour:
Sam Maggs
Format:
Hardcover
Publication date:
October 2nd 2018
Publisher:
Quirk Books
Source:
Received from publisher.

Review:

“They are strong-willed and steadfast leaders whose very existence dissents from the way the world has been run for the last two thousand years–and affirms what the future should be.” (p. 105)

What I like when it comes to Sam Maggs’ books are how they remain inspiring, funny and a marvelous starting points for reading about pop culture and feminist figures. In Girl Squads: 20 Female Friendships That Changed History, Maggs takes us through history sharing the stories of women helping other women to rise. 

Before reading Girl Squads, I was already familiar with several women for instance I was aware of the Trưng sisters, the Supreme Justices Ruth Bader and Sonia Sotomayor and Dr. Kei Okami and Dr. Anandibai Joshi who were two of the first eastern doctors of western medicine. However, similar to her other books I learned a great deal more about other awesome women, including the Edinburgh Seven who were the first women medical students in Great Britain and the Red Lanterns, a Chinese girls’ fighting group, the Red Women of Finland and the Japanese volleyball team known as the “witches of the orient”. Reading all these stories of women uniting together made for an incredibly heartwarming read. This book also extremely inspired as the women in the book faced countless obstacles in their path to in order to accomplish their goals. And while they weren’t always completely successful, their perseverance definitely left me feeling empowered. 

With its light and entertaining writing style in addition to the bright, colourful packaging and illustrations, Girl Squads is a book that is unquestionably geared towards a younger, preteen audience. This is awesome as it makes feminist history and women’s stories accessible to those who are looking for positive examples of women around the world and across time. For those of us who are slightly older, Girl Squads is one of those books that can easily be read in one sitting. I’d recommend this one for those looking for an uplifting read as it provides an excellent introduction to a number of exceptionally fascinating groups of women.

 

 

 

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

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Book Review | Wonder Women: 25 Innovators, Inventors, and Trailblazers Who Changed History by Sam Maggs

WWAuthour:
Sam Maggs
Format:
E-galley
Publication date:
October 4th 2016
Publisher:
Quirk Books
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:
I’m a total history buff and I love learning about kick butt women whose accomplishments have been mostly lost to history, thus this book was the ideal read for me. Furthermore, it made for a perfect companion for Jessica Bennett’s The Feminist Fight Club, which was the other book I was reading at the same time.

Sam Magg’s Wonder Women: 25 Innovators, Inventors, and Trailblazers Who Changed History showcases an array of pioneering female scientists, engineers, mathematicians, adventurers, and inventors many of whom I was unaware of, like Dr. Okami Keiko (the first Japanese woman to get a degree in Western medicine from a Western university) and Dr. Anandibai Joshi (the first woman physician) who were actually well acquainted with each other. I also loved reading about Dr. Marie Equi, who was a birth control advocate and not afraid to get physical to defend what’s right.

In addition to the 25 women that were featured there were also various mini biographies in addition to interviews with women who today are working in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) field. Overall, Wonder Women was an entertaining read due in part to the illustrations as well as Maggs’ witty commentary throughout the book of the women featured. And I appreciated how diverse the women were in the book as there were women of various races, sexual orientation and status. A great read for young girls and anyone who is looking for a bit of inspiration.

 

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | The Fangirl’s Guide to the Galaxy: A Handbook for Girl Geeks by Sam Maggs

fangirlAuthour:
Sam Maggs
Format:
Hardcover, 207 pages
Publication date:
May 12th 2015
Publisher:
Quirk Books
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:

“Every fangirl is different. Her very identity as a fangirl is predicated on the fandom that gives her all the feels.” (p. 16)

When I first heard that this book was coming out, my interest was positively peaked. As somebody who considers herself to be a geek and a fan girl, I was definitely interested to read what Sam Maggs had to say.

The Fangirl’s Guide to the Galaxy: A Handbook for Girl Geeks resembles a “how to” guide on the different aspects of fandom such as cosplay, conventions in addition there’s also a glossary of key terms when it comes to feminism and all things geek. While for countless geeks, the material in the book perhaps may seem akin to common sense, I thought it was written in a manner that made it entertaining to read regardless of whether or not you are familiar with the topics discussed in the book. Furthermore I certainly appreciated the section on kick ass female characters as I truly was unaware of several of them, and now that I know of them I am definitely putting them on my list of comics and books to read and shows to watch. In addition I loved reading the interviews with well-known personalities on what being a fan girl means to them.

Overall, The Fangirl’s Guide to the Galaxy serves as an excellent introduction to all things geeky, and I loved that it was written from a feminist perspective that is accessible to all. Therefore even if you aren’t new to being nerdy/geek, I believe there are still a few useful things that you can pick up from this book including the section on the list of online resources and websites that are ideal for those looking maybe meet other geeks and gain further knowledge. The Fangirl’s Guide to the Galaxy is a book that I will definitely be passing along to my fellow geeky friends, even those that aren’t avid readers.

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Waiting on Wednesday #21 | The Fangirl’s Guide to the Galaxy: A Handbook for Girl Geeks by Sam Maggs

wed

Waiting on Wednesday is a weekly meme that highlights upcoming titles that we’re looking forward to/dying to read.
It is hosted by Jill at Breaking the Spine
fangirl
Authour:
Sam Maggs
Publication date:
May 12th 2015
Publisher:
Quirk Books

Synposis:

Fanfic, cosplay, cons, books, memes, podcasts, vlogs, OTPs and RPGs and MMOs and more—it’s never been a better time to be a girl geek. The Fangirl’s Guide to the Galaxy is the ultimate handbook for ladies living the nerdy life, a fun and feminist take on the often male-dominated world of geekdom. With delightful illustrations and an unabashed love for all the in(ternet)s and outs of geek culture, this book is packed with tips, playthroughs, and cheat codes for everything from starting an online fan community to planning a convention visit to supporting fellow female geeks in the wild

When I first heard about this book, I knew I needed it right away. I love that there’s finally a book aimed at female geeks, and I can’t wait for this book to come out. I plan on sharing this book with my group of friends from high school as we all identified ourselves as geeks and would definitely find this book a very useful as well as fun read.

What books are you “waiting” on this week?