5 Fiction Books Coming Your Way in Fall 2020

With the pandemic and lockdown happening where I lived, all book events were moved from in person to online. So instead of attending the Penguin Teen Social and Frenzy Presents events in person like I usually do in the previous, I ended up watching them online. Anyways keeping with the tradition, I thought I’d share some of my top picks of for this fall from both events. Please feel free to comment on the post with what books you’re looking forward to reading this fall/winter.

Charming as a Verb by Ben PHILIPe (RELEASE DATE: September 8, 2020)

Last year I was fortunate enough to attend a party for Ben Phillipe’s debut novel, The Field Guide to the North American Teenage which was a surprisingly charming and witty read. Ben’s second book is also perfect if you’ve read and enjoyed his first novel or if you’re a fan of Nicola Yoon’s books. Charming as a Verb follows Henri “Halti” and Corinne’s unlikely and somewhat “forced” friendship as it potentially develops into something more all while they’re both dealing with the usual stress of being a senior in high school with dreams of going to one of the prestigious colleges. On top of the pressure they feel, they also find themselves confronting real issues that children of immigrants face regularly like code switching and gentrification.

Jo An Adaptation of Little Women (Sort Of) By Kathleen Gros (Release date: September 22, 2020)

Jo is probably my favourite of the March sisters, even if I would’ve prefer she stay unmarried in the end. Anyways, the latest adaption of Little Womenis a middle-grade graphic novel that appears to also take the characters into more modern times. Here, Jo is a 13 years old who has her own blog and also works for her school newspaper. There’s definitely a few new twists in this tale, as Jo realizes not only is she unable to return the feelings of her best friend Laurie but she may not be into guys at all? This one looks like it will not only be a cute story but also a diverse and inclusive one as well, oh and bonus points for it being by a fellow Canadian!

All About Us by Tom Ellen (Release date: October 13, 2020)

One of the few adult titles that were showcased during the Frenzy Presents presentation. This one is for all you fans of Christmas novels with a dash of romance and time travel in the mix! Another take on the classic A Christmas Carol, All About Us is about a man who’s failing marriage makes him wonder if he had the right choice years ago and if he would make the same choice again if given the chance to go back to that fateful day in 2005. Adorable, funny, and possibly heartbreaking this one is for those who love David Nicholls’s One Day or the movie 13 Going on 30 with Jennifer Garner and Mark Ruffalo.

The Magic Fish by Trung Lê Nguyễn (RELEASE DATE: October 13, 2020)

This Own Voices graphic novel reads like a memoir. I love seeing more books by Vietnamese storytellers. as someone of Vietnamese descent and a lover of comics, I’m really looking forward to this one, both for the story and the beautiful illustrations. Apparently there are three interwoven plots in Trung Lê Nguyễn’s The Magic Fish. The first is a fairytale that is read to Tiến by his grandparents, the second is the story of the grandparents living in Vietnam during colonial time and finally we have the story of Tiến trying to find the words both in Vietnamese and English to tell his parents that he is gay. all three have distinctive art styles, so readers will be able to differentiate between the stories.

Super Fake Love Song by David yoon (RELEASE DATE: November 17, 2020)


David Yoon’s Frankly in Love was one of my favourite books last year. I loved his writing and portrayal one of teen boy’s experience growing up as a son in a Korean immigrant household so I’m excited for his sophomore novel! The synopsis of this one sounds interesting with its themes of rock music and a small lie getting out of control. Plus I’m hoping for more of his fictional but realistic take on teen relationships in high school.

Midweek Mini Reviews #29

This Midweek Mini Reviews post features two new YA titles.

Once Upon an Eid: Stories of Hope and Joy by 15 Muslim Voices
Once Upon an Eid is an anthology of short stories that take place around or during Eid, a religious festival celebrated by Muslims worldwide that marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan. As a non-Muslim person, I was intrigued by this book because I am familiar with some of the authors who have stories in this collection including S.K. Ali who is one of the editors. Like any holiday anthology the 15 stories are all heartwarming, fun and joyful in their own way. Two of my favourites were Like Chest Armor and Huda Al-Marashi’s Not Only an Only. The former was an adorable story about a girl’s first time wearing a hijab with touching upon other things like crushes and fandom in middle school, while the latter was a story about female friendship that I anyone who has been a minority in their school could relate to. I also enjoyed Asmaa Hussein’s Kareem Means Generous because it gave me a warm, fuzzy feeling and I liked that it is set in Toronto, Canada. As Once Upon an Eid is geared towards middle grade and not YA, I’m far from the target audience for this short story collection. However, even I can tell after reading all the stories that Once Upon an Eid is a special book and I love getting a glimpse at how different cultures celebrate Eid. With the countless number of Christmas books out there, it’s nice that Muslims kids are able to have another collection of stories that they could personally relate to.

My Summer of Love and Misfortune by Lindsay Wong
Pitched as Crazy Rich Asians meets Love & Gelato, I really wanted to like My Summer of Love and Misfortune. But it took way too long to get into it, and while I could appreciate the character development and growth I couldn’t completely buy into Iris’s “transformation”. While it doesn’t necessarily mean this is a bad thing, in the case of My Summer of Love and Misfortune the uneven pacing along with all the drama in the book gave me whiplash. In spite of that, I didn’t hate Iris, in fact I couldn’t help but feel bad for her because she really is clueless and while she is shallow she truly believes she has good intentions. Also despite being an annoying character, I was still rooting for her to finally stand up for herself against those who did not treat her well. The writing in this book was strong, along with all the juicy family drama redeemed this book for me just a bit. My favourite parts were seeing the Wang family reunited and seeing Iris and her cousin Ruby come together and realize they actually make a great team. It’s unfortunate, but My Summer of Love and Misfortune was not the fun and light summer read that I had hoped it would be.

 

 

 

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above reviews consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Midweek Mini Reviews #23

This Midweek Mini Reviews post features two books for kids, just in time for the TD Canadian Children’s Book Week!

Sakura’s Cherry Blossoms written by Robert Paul Weston & illustrated by Misa Saburi 

I don’t often read and review picture books, but Sakura’s Cherry Blossoms was such an adorable and heartwarming read that I’d thought I share on my blog. Written by Robert Paul Weston and gorgeously illustrated by Miso Saburi, this book follows a little girl named Sakura whose family has to move from Japan to the US. This book is perfect for kids, especially those who have moved to a new city or even country as it perfectly captures the difficulties that kids may face as well it shows the importance of good friends and how strong family bonds will always be there even when you are not physically near each other. Sakura’s Cherry Blossoms manages to stay light-hearted for kids while touching on topics like fitting in, bullying, homesickness and illness. I also loved how it shows that as a new kid even if you have just one friend, if they’re a good one it will make all the difference. Despite not being a kid, I really did enjoy both the story and the illustrations. And I think even adult readers would be able to appreciate the charm of Sakura’s Cherry Blossoms especially if they’re fans of seeing cherry blossoms in the spring.

Clara Voyant by Rachelle Delaney

Middle Grade books tend to be either a hit or miss for me. For instance, I adore Susin Nielsen’s books but haven’t had much luck with other middle-grade novels. However, Vikki VanSickle at Penguin Random House Canada made a strong case for Rachelle Delaney’s Clara Voyant that I just had to give it a chance. This novel is set Toronto’s Kensington Market, which had me intrigued as it’s a neighbourhood that I’ve recently discovered and fell in love with. I also liked the premise of astrology and psychic abilities. That being said, it took me an incredibly long time to get invested in the characters and plot as it was only near the end when the book started to get interesting for me. What I did appreciate about this novel, however was the wonderful friendship between Clara and Maeve, and how both girls had their own ambitions but still made time for each other. I also thought the twist at the end and the reveal of what happened to the missing mascot to be quite clever. While Clara Voyant certainly had its satisfying and entertaining moments, overall I don’t think this was my cup of tea. I do think that this would make for an excellent read for those in middle grade who are slowly figuring out who they are and who might not feel completely comfortable in their own skin yet.

 

 

 

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above reviews consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.