Book Review | I’ll Tell You in Person by Chloe Caldwell

tellyouAuthour:
Chloe Caldwell
Format:
Trade Paperback, 170 pages
Publication date:
October 4th 2016
Publisher:
Coffee House Press
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:
I found out about Chloe Caldwell’s second collection of essays, “I’ll Tell You in Person” through an article that was shared on Twitter. It spoke of the collection of essays telling the experiences of a young woman caught between the ages of 20 and 30 which made me feel that perhaps I could relate to what she had to say. Additionally, as I was in the midst of trying to write my own personal essays I felt that it would be helpful to read what others have written. Apparently I’m not alone in doing this, as Chloe also notes in an interview included in the book that she read a bunch of personal essay collections while in the process of writing this book.

Initially when I started reading the first few lines of the book, I found that I’ll Tell You in Person did indeed speak to me. However, my initial infatuation with the book didn’t subside as in the end like any collection, some of the essays were strong while others were not as well written. Furthermore, some of the essays were about topics that I knew little of and/or could not relate though majority of the essays were interesting to read. In the end, my two favourites that stood out in the book, would have to be “Failing Singing” about giving up a talent that you have and “Sister Less‘, a heartwarming essay on the bond that Chloe forms with Bobbi, who the daughter of writer, Cheryl Strayed.

I’ll Tell You in Person, is a short read that makes it the perfect companion for a commuter. However, be forewarned that it does pack a powerful emotional punch, especially for those who find themselves in a similar stage of their life. Meaning one that’s prone to a great deal of imperfection and disillusionment as well as a bit of disorientation. But, hey we all need to go through it at some point, no?

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | My (Part-Time) Paris Life: How Running Away Brought Me Home by Lisa Anselmo

ptparisAuthour:
Lisa Anselmo
Format:
E-galley
Publication date:
October 11th 2016
Publisher:
Thomas Dunne Books
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:
As someone who has a close relationship with her mother, I can’t even begin to imagine my life without her. As a result, I felt this book would resonate with me as the author loses her mother to cancer, and it forces her to re-evaluate her life after having lived with a mother who always needed to be in control.

I adored the travel aspect of the book, as I always do in the books I read. Although, I must confess I have never been to Paris and it had not been high on my travel priority list for some time. However, My (Part-Time) Paris Life: How Running Away Brought Me Home made me reconsider my hesitations about visiting “The City of Lights”. This may also be a result of the drool worthy, glorious descriptions that the author provides of the various foods she samples while in Paris and France.

One of my favourite sections in My (Part-Time) Paris Life was the chapter titled, “Le Dating Game”. I enjoyed this chapter for the reason that Anselmo acknowledges that dating is difficult, especially in another country with a different culture. And it was refreshing to glimpse her reflections on her past and acknowledge how her tight relationship with her mother has affected her love life. I especially love that in the end she came to the conclusion that she needs to embrace her independence and to become re-acquainted with herself as an “individual” before embarking on any serious romance.

And while I wish there was more to her story and adventure in the book, I’ll definitely be checking out her mini web series. Highly recommended to anyone who loves a good, self-searching memoir about dealing with grief, and learning to just let yourself be happy in life. If it hasn’t crossed your mind to visit “La Ville-Lumière”, it definitely will after reading this book.

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | Pen & Palate: Mastering the Art of Adulthood, with Recipes by Lucy Madison and Tram Nguyen

pensAuthour:
Lucy Madison and Tram Nguyen
Format:
ARC, 287 pages
Publication date:
May 31st 2016
Publisher:
Grand Central Life & Style
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:
For those of you who aren’t aware, “Words of Mystery” is in reality currently compose of two of us. Though she is less involved now, my best friend from high school was instrumental when I first took over this blog as she often provided a second opinion on posts and assisted with some of the design of the blog. And perhaps that was why I enjoyed Pen & Palate: Mastering the Art of Adulthood, with Recipes by Lucy Madison and Tram Nguyen since I could relate to a majority of it.

Pen & Palate started off as a (still running) food blog run by Lucy Madison and Tram Nguyen who have been best friends since high school. Lucy is a New York based writer and journalist and Tram is an illustrator and costume designer who lives in Chicago. Both women contribute blog posts consisting of personal essays and recipe while Tram provides the lovely illustrations that go along with each of the post. While I was aware of the blog before this book, I’m glad that I got to discover their blog through this book.

An entertaining element with regards to Pen & Palate: Mastering the Art of Adulthood, with Recipes is how the book is structured as chapters that alternate between Lucy and Tram. As a result, we see various events from both their perspective which serves to illustrate that occasionally the grass may seem greener on other side however isn’t quite true. When it comes to your friends, the majority of them who seem as if they have things figured out probably are in a similar boat as you. Additionally, I enjoyed was how I can relate to numerous things that Tram mentions in her chapters, since also being of Vietnamese descent several instances of what she described appear as if they could have come from my life too. It’s always wonderful to read writing from people who come from a similar cultural background as you, especially as there are not that many Vietnamese writers out there.

Anyways, Pen & Palate: Mastering the Art of Adulthood, with Recipes is the perfect book for those who love food and who are in the so-called “emerging adulthood” stage of their life. I loved how it perfectly captures how female friendships evolve as people grow and perhaps embark on different paths.

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | Crime Seen by Kate Lines

crimeseenAuthour:
Kate Lines
Format:
Hardcover, 247 pages
Publication date:
April 7th 2015
Publisher:
Random House Canada
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:

“We may have been deep underground, but where we were was definitely the real world, where trying to understand the criminal mind could be a matter of life or death.” (p. 4)

As somebody who once flirted with the idea of becoming a profiler, I was looking forward to reading Crime Seen as not is it by a former profiler, but one that is also a Canadian and a woman. For those of you who love watching crime show dramas similar to CSI, Criminal Minds or even Bones, I would definitely recommend that you pick this book up. As a proud Canadian, I loved the fact that the authour herself is Canadian as its more common for us to observe how the American police system works since that is what’s usually portrayed in TV shows and movies.

Having taken a few courses in law and psychology in university, I took pleasure in reading the book and recognizing several of the methods and theory from what I learned in class. Although, the majority of it was stuff I was already aware of, it was still interesting to read the first hand experience of a Canadian police officer and profiler. Not only do you get to read on the subject of how a profile is created, and how a profiler mind works on the job, but you also get a glimpse into the possible inner workings of various criminals.

However, Crime Seen is more than a book concerning crime; it’s also an extremely inspiring story concerning how one woman was persistent and took every opportunity that came her way to advancing herself and work her way up the ladder in a field that still is today dominated by men. As one of the Canadians to study at FBI academy, Kate Lines broke through countless glass ceilings on her way to the top and to her position as the chief superintendent of the OPP. As this is also her story, we get to witness what it was like being a woman on the police force when women were just starting to become police officers. In particular, I enjoyed her recollections of her time as an undercover cop. Since, this is an area that is often glamorized by Hollywood; it was refreshing to hear about the grittier, less luxurious side of doing undercover work.

Finally, Crime Seen is also a story concerning the victims of the cases that Lines worked on throughout her career. The stories she shares regarding the victims and their families are both raw and meaningful whether or not they had a “happy ending”. And as these were real life cases, there wasn’t always a pleasant, happy ending with all the loose ends tied up. All in all, I found Crime Seen a compelling read that was truly difficult to put down.

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | Seven Letters from Paris by Samantha Verant

7letterAuthour:
Samantha Verant
Format:
Advance Reader Copy, 258 pages
Publication date:
October 7th 2014
Publisher:
Sourcebooks
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:
I love a good love story especially ones that involve travel of some kind, and it’s even better if the story is one that actually happened as there is a serious lack of epic love stories in my real life. (No offence intended to anyone I know who may be reading this)

What I loved regarding Seven Letters from Paris is that it is such a delightful story of romance, missed opportunities and second chances. It is a book that is fairly reminiscent to the YA novel, Just One Day by Gayle Forman which I adore with the exception that there are a few twists one of which is that the book is a memoir of the authour’s real life fairy tale romance. Seven Letters from Paris concerns a disillusioned woman who is nearing forty who is recently separated from her husband and broke. As she tries to figure out where she went wrong in her life, she comes across seven love letters written to her from a handsome French scientist whom she met and got to be acquainted with for only a day when she was nineteen. She subsequently decides to take a risk and attempt to find him, and the rest of the book details her adventures that come once the two reconnect.

Throughout it all the writing is simple and crisp, and the story was certainly engrossing. My favourite component of this book however was the fact that all seven of Jean-Luc’s (the French scientist) love letters were included in this book. It added a charming touch to the story especially given how significant of a role they played in the book. Occasionally the truth can be even better and more interesting than fiction, and this book was an example of this.

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | Laughing All the Way to the Mosque by Zarqa Nawaz

Authour:mosque
Zarqa Nawaz
Format:
Advance Reader Copy, 237 pages
Publication date:
June 24th 2014
Publisher:
HarperCollins Canada
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:
Back in high school, I discovered and fell in love with a Canadian television show called Little Mosque on the Prairie. It was so different from all the other shows I had seen on TV not to mention that it was funny and had a great cast of well written characters. As a result, when I heard that the creator of Little Mosque on the Prairie was coming out with a book that was a sort of memoir, I knew that it would be on my to-read list.

Laughing All the Way to the Mosque is a book that is divided into numerous short chapters, each touching upon different aspects of Islamic culture and the authour’s personal experience with them. I love the earlier chapters more than the later ones since the experiences were awfully relatable to me even though I’m not a Muslim. I can, however definitely relate to the feelings of not fitting in as a kid and feeling like an outsider as I was one of only two Asians in my elementary school which was dominated by Italians.

The chapters that stood out to me were, “Muslim Summer Camp” and “Meeting Sami”. The former was about the time she was left in charge of running a Muslim Summer camp for kids and had no idea what she was doing while the latter recounts her adventures meeting various suitors before she met the man who would later become her husband. Both of these stories were hilarious to read about and they were my two favourites in this book. However my favourite one as it is the chapter that I relate the largely to, would have to be, “Medical School Reject”. For anyone who’s been a student and who has had their plans for after graduation fall apart, Zarqa’s story and journey is a definite must read.

In conclusion, Laughing All the Way to the Mosque is an exceptionally entertaining and comedic look at at one woman’s view of growing up Muslim. I love how the book ends with a chapter titled, “Photos with White Men”. I first heard it on the CBC radio show, DNTO and I loved reading it because of its message that no matter what culture you are, your mother always knows best.

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | How to Succeed in Business Without Really Crying by Carol Leifer

Authour:suceedbus
Carol Leifer
Format:
Advance Reader Copy, 224 pages
Publication date:
April 8th 2014
Publisher:
Quirk Books
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:
How to Succeed in Business without Really Crying is a sort of memoir written by Carol Leifer, who is a comedian, writer, producer and actress. In case you haven’t heard of her (I know I didn’t before picking up this book), she was a writer for shows like Seinfeld and Saturday Night Live, in addition to being one of the creators of The Ellen Show which was a sitcom starring Ellen DeGeneres.

Initially this book did intrigue me, and so I was more than happy to start reading it when a friend of mine suggested I pick it up next. How to Succeed in Business without Really Crying was an interesting look at one woman’s career, I love reading about how she got her start and how supportive her parents were of her dreams and goals. And I think it was a nice touch that she wove pieces of incredibly useful and practical advice that can be applied to any career and not just show business within the anecdotes and stories that she tells about her life. Overall there was an excellent mixture of life stories and practical advice throughout.

While several of her advice may seem obvious to several readers, I personally felt that I learned so much. In fact, I found myself putting various sticky tabs throughout my copy, all while having the urge to highlight or underline certain things in the books so that I can go back and find them again in the future. All in all, How to Succeed in Business without Really Crying was an extremely straightforward and highly entertaining read. It is a book that you want to savour because it’s so short and you don’t want to miss anything. And despite being chocked full of useful and practical advice, the conversational tone of the writing allows it to not come off as too preachy. I would highly recommend this book for anyone currently looking for work especially in this economy.

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | Paris Letters by Janice Macleod

Authour:parisletter
Janice Macleod
Format:
Advance Reader Copy, 258 pages
Publication date:
February 4th 2014
Publisher:
Sourcebooks
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:
This was the second memoir I read that was set in Paris but Paris Letters is definitely a much different story than We’ll Always Have Paris. Here we have a young woman who finds herself disillusioned with her day job as a copywriter in an advertising agency. Eventually she figures out a way to put aside enough money so that she could get by without working for a bit. These are outlined in a list which is included in the back of the book and includes things like selling her finished paintings, using all her free samples and inviting friends to go for hikes, coffee or frozen yogurt instead of waiting for them to invite her out to eat at an expensive restaurant. Of course this works and she is able to finally quit her job and travel.

I loved the travel elements in this memoir mostly because I can absolutely relate to some of her fish out of water experiences, as my knowledge of French pretty much consists of what I learned up until first year of college. I also loved that the author was Canadian as it makes her story at least initially more relatable.

Fittingly as the story takes place in Paris, France there is some romance in this book as Janice meets Christophe, a French speaking Polish butcher who she says kind of looks like Daniel Craig. I thought the way Janice relates their encounters and interactions with each other were really cute.

Paris Letters is a beautiful book both in its story as well as the many watercolour illustrations included in the book, and although they are in black and white, the cover is however in colour and it is gorgeous. I love how Janice comes up with the idea to create handwritten letters with beautiful illustrations about her life in Paris to fund her life in Paris. And to be honest I kind of want one now.

This travel memoir is a perfect read for both those who are a bit of a hopeless romantic as well as those who want to redesign their lives and fancy themselves as artists or some kind of creative person. Without a doubt I want to travel to Paris even more after reading this book.

If you like this book, you’ll love: Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | We’ll Always Have Paris: A Mother/Daughter Adventure by Jennifer Coburn

Authour:alwaysparis
Jennifer Coburn
Format:
Advance Reader Copy, 376 pages
Publication date:
April 8th 2014
Publisher:
Sourcebooks
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:
We’ll Always Have Paris may not have much romance in it but it is definitely a story of love in particular family love. This is much more than a Paris travelogue as the memoir details all the various trips that Jennifer takes with her daughter Katie as Katie grows up. They not only travel to Paris but to many other European cities like Rome, London and Barcelona. Initially I couldn’t relate to either Jennifer or Katie, the latter being only a child at the start of the book I was able to relate to some of their experiences later as Katie got older. I loved seeing all the different places they visited and what they did there, and this book made me really want to travel right away with my mom to visit all the sites in the book including Shakespeare and Co. I had no idea that travelers could stay above the shop overnight if they worked a few hours a day at the bookstore, which was interesting. There were so many interesting travel tidbits throughout the book which made it feel like a sort of travel guide on top of being a memoir.

The travel aspect of the book was something that I expected given the title, but what I did not expect was the exploration into Jennifer’s past in particular the life of her father, who was one of the songwriters of the song, “Only A Fool Breaks His Own Heart”. Though it ran secondary to the travel parts, it was still a very essential part of this memoir. It is through the relationship that Jennifer has with her father that shapes who she is as an adult this includes of course her anxieties about dying. So while this book was not what I was expecting, it was a very touching and interesting read. We’ll Always Have Paris does a good job of exploring how one woman deals with the death of her parent and the trauma associated with it, as well it does an excellent job of illustrating the magic of traveling together as a family and how it can strengthen bonds and bring parents closer to their children.

If you like this book, you’ll love: The End of Your Life Book Club by Will Schwalbe

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | Listen to the Squawking Chicken: A Daughter’s Blueprint for Life from the Mother Who Thinks She Knows Best

Authour:chicken
Elaine Lui
Format:
Advance Reader Copy, 223 pages
Publication date:
April 1st 2014
Publisher:
Random House Canada
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:
My siblings and I grew up with not one, but two Asian immigrant moms. The first being of course our biological mothers, and the second being her older sister, our aunt, who we add the prefix “ma” in front of her name instead of calling her “auntie”. So I can definitely relate to many of the things mentioned in Elaine Luis’s sort of memoir. However in my case, my mom’s older sister fits more of the stereotypes of “Chinese” moms than my actual mother. This was probably the main draw for me when it came to this book; I love reading non-fiction especially those that I know I can relate to. My “moms” both used shaming and public embarrassment as well as guilt to get us to do what they want us to do. This mostly consisted of not being lazy and working hard instead of day dreaming.

What makes Listen to the Squawking Chicken: A Daughter’s Blueprint for Life from the Mother Who Thinks She Knows Best (I know – long title, right?) unique, in my opinion, is that it tells real stories of both Elaine and her mother aka”the squawking chicken” while at the same time incorporating elements of Chinese superstition and mythology into real life events in the book. I actually learned a lot more about Chinese culture than I did before as many of the traditions aren’t practiced in my family.

The Squawking Chicken is quite a fascinating character, and after learning about her past we get a better sense that she is a person who was reborn as the person she became out of the circumstances in her life. She is also someone who I would love to meet out of curiosity, but would probably be too intimidated to meet in real life. Though Elaine comments many times that this is her mother’s story, by the end of the book I felt like it was more of a story about both of them with a particular spotlight on the special mother-daughter relationship Elaine and her mother share.

Although Listen to the Squawking Chicken is a very short read, it is full of substance within its pages. There is also a good mix of hilarious moments like when the Squawking Chicken rounds up a bunch of her mah-jong playmates to go confront a home wrecker. This, however, is balanced out with serious moments – such as the story of the Squawking Chicken’s past and her inability to keep friends. Overall Listen to the Squawking Chicken: a Daughter’s Blueprint for Life from the Mother Who Thinks She Knows Best is a highly enjoyable read that I think will make many think twice about taking their mothers for granted.

My squawking chickens.
My squawking chickens.

UPDATE: I recently got to meet Elaine (aka Lainey) at a signing she did in Toronto and received both an arc signed for my sister, as well as a personalized finished copy of her book for me. I was extremely nervous and didn’t say much when I met her, but Lainey was incredibly kind in person as she took the time to chat with me and even got up when I asked to take a picture with her. Also just wanted to give a shout out here to the Random House publicist, Adria who was at the event. Thank you for making me feel extremely welcomed and comfortable. Overall it was a great event, and it was really interesting to hear Lainey speak in person about her experiences writing her book and about her mother.

If you like this book, you’ll love: The End of Your Life Book Club by Will Schwalbe

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | Never Have I Ever by Katie Heaney

Authour:neverhave
Katie Heaney
Format:
Trade Paperback, 255 pages
Publication date:
January 14, 2014
Publisher:
Grand Central Publishing
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.
Synopsis:

“I’ve been single for my entire life. Not one boyfriend. Not one short-term dating situation. Not one person with whom I regularly hung out and kissed on the face.”

So begins Katie Heaney’s memoir of her years spent looking for love, but never quite finding it. By age 25, equipped with a college degree, a load of friends, and a happy family life, she still has never had a boyfriend … and she’s barely even been on a second date.

Throughout this laugh-out-loud funny book, you will meet Katie’s loyal group of girlfriends, including flirtatious and outgoing Rylee, the wild child to Katie’s shrinking violet, as well as a whole roster of Katie’s ill-fated crushes. And you will get to know Katie herself — a smart, modern heroine relaying truths about everything from the subtleties of a Facebook message exchange to the fact that “Everybody who works in a coffee shop is at least a little bit hot.”

Funny, relatable, and inspiring, this is a memoir for anyone who has ever struggled to find love, but has also had a lot of fun in the process.

Review:

“That’s what I hope this book feels like. You and I are hanging out, and I am drinking too much and talking to you–about my most embarrassing adventures in flirting and kissing and liking boys–for a really long time.”

I don’t normally review non-fiction titles on my blog so when I do feature a non-fiction book on my blog (usually a memoir of some sort) it is because I really enjoyed it which was exactly the case when it came to Katie Heaney’s Never Have I Ever. This book is a fearless memoir about what’s it like to find love when you have somewhat unrealistic notions about what love is really like. Is also about female friendships and how nice, complicated and necessary they are.

As one of a few (three to be exact) in my circle of girlfriends to have never had a boyfriend before, I really wanted to read this book because it felt like something I could relate to. Though I am very happy and secure in my lack of a relationship, my friends do express their insecurities from time to time, sometimes rather loudly. It’s rare to see people talking openly about being single, and enjoying while at the same time wondering (in a not desperate manner) why you can’t find love which made this book seem even more appealing to me.

After reading this book, I’m glad to say that this little memoir did not let me down in spite of my high expectations. It was as I predicted, very relatable in addition to being absolutely hilarious and utterly adorable and charming. I loved that it was a short and simple read though with many hidden emotional depths throughout which makes it an easy read for those who are not big readers. I also loved how the book was divided up into different parts of her life such as her childhood, high school years, college and even grad school. Overall I think Heaney does a good job at capturing not only what it’s like to be single when it seems like all your friends are out dating people, but also what it’s like to be a twenty-something year old today. I highly recommend Never Have I Ever to anyone who is or remembers what it was like being single and trying to find love and not finding what you’re looking for. Also to those who think that there’s something wrong with them because they can’t find a date, I really think you should pick up this book. I for one will definitely be putting this book into the hands of my friends especially those who could really use some hope that no matter what they think they will (probably) find that special someone someday.

If you like this book, you’ll love: Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns) by Mindy Kaling

Rating: 4 out of 5 Stars

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | This Is the Story of a Happy Marriage by Ann Patchett

Authour:happy marriage
Ann Patchett
Format:
Advance Reader Copy, 306 pages
Publication date:
November 5th 2013
Publisher:
Harper
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Synopsis:

Blending literature and memoir, Ann Patchett, author of State of Wonder, Run, and Bel Canto, examines her deepest commitments—to writing, family, friends, dogs, books, and her husband—creating a resonant portrait of a life in This is the Story of a Happy Marriage.

This Is the Story of a Happy Marriage takes us into the very real world of Ann Patchett’s life. Stretching from her childhood to the present day, from a disastrous early marriage to a later happy one, it covers a multitude of topics, including relationships with family and friends, and charts the hard work and joy of writing, and the unexpected thrill of opening a bookstore.

As she shares stories of the people, places, ideals, and art to which she has remained indelibly committed, Ann Patchett brings into focus the large experiences and small moments that have shaped her as a daughter, wife, and writer.

Review:

“Why is it that we understand playing the cello will require work, but we attribute writing to the magic of inspiration?” (p. 28)

While I do pride myself on reading fiction and non-fiction, it’s not very often that I review or request non-fiction books for review unless I am very interested in the book. What I love about Ann Patchett’s collection of essays, titled This Is the Story of a Happy Marriage is that it reads like any other piece of literature making it also appeal to those who are normally fiction readers. For some people, the thought of reading essays for pleasure may seem intimidating but I do not think it is the case with this collection. I found Patchett’s writing to be very accessible, her writing really spoke to me and it was kind of interesting to get glimpses of her life from the various essays.

My favourite essays in this collection would have to be the ones where she talks about her personal relationships such as those about her divorce, marriage, in addition to the ones about her relationships with her father, grandmother, dog and some of her best friends. In particular I especially enjoyed reading, “This Dog’s Life” even though I’m not a dog person. I liked it mostly because I found it hilarious that other people attributed her relationship to her dog with a desire to have a baby which was not the case. I also really enjoyed “The Wall”, in which Patchett talks about trying out for the LAPD. It was an extremely fascinating read as readers are given a sort of behind the scenes look at what the police exams entails. I also loved that it showed us more of her relationship with her father who used to work in the LAPD before he retired.

This Is The Story of a Happy Marriage is a wonderful non-fiction read about Patchett’s life, and for those who are currently struggling to write it also provides a lot of good insights and advice into the process of writing without romanticizing the profession of being a writer too much.

If you like this book, you’ll love: Sister Mother Husband Dog by Delia Ephron

Rating: 4 out of 5 Stars

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.