Mystery Monday | Even Dogs in the Wild (Inspector Rebus #20) by Ian Rankin

Mystery Mondays

Mystery Mondays is an occasional review feature here on Words of Mystery that showcases books in the mystery (and on occasion thriller) genre that we are currently reading and our thoughts on them. Feel free to comment and leave suggestions as to what we should read and review next.

Who is it by? Ian Rankin, is an internationally bestselling Scottish authour known for his Inspector Rebus and Detective Malcolm Fox novels. He currently lives in Edinburgh with his family.

What is it about? Once again Rebus is retired, but he finds himself brought back in the game (sort of) as a consultant, when his old acquaintance Big Ger Cafferty is attacked. At the same time Detective Siobhan Clarke and DI Malcolm Fox are investigating the death of a senior lawyer. As the investigations on both cases continue, it appears that the two cases may be more closely linked than it first appears.

evendogs

Where does it take place? Like most other Rebus novels, Even Dogs in the Wild is set mostly in Edinburgh though as with most cases there is travel to other areas nearby for investigation purposes.

Why did I like it? One of the most fascinating elements of the Rebus novels is the complicated relationship/friendship between Rebus and Big Ger Cafferty, a gangster who ran the underground world in Edinburgh. Even now with Rebus retired and Cafferty not as in the “game” as he was before, the two still have a deeply intriguing relationship which is explored further in this novel when Cafferty’s life is threatened. Another interesting theme that is woven through the novel are the various familial or familial-like relationships. It’s nice seeing Rebus look out for Siobhan even if she can take care of things herself. And Ian Rankin does an excellent job of exploring the numerous layers and complicated dynamics of the various father-son (or daughter) relationships in the book.

All and all, I loved how the book is gritty yet it still manages to keep things light on occasion with things such as a running gag of Rebus trying to find a home for the stray dog that follows him. It’s hilarious reading the scenes where he literally tries passing it on to everybody he meets in a majorly obvious manner while also reading about a dark case that involves a great deal of cover up and corruption. Thus, while Even Dogs in the Wild starts of slow, it eventually builds up to an intriguing case where once again the line between good and bad aren’t clearly drawn.

When is it out? November 5, 2015

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Mystery Monday | FaceOff

Mystery Mondays

Mystery Mondays is a sometimes weekly, sometimes biweekly and sometimes monthly review feature here on Words of Mystery that showcases books in the mystery (and on occasion thriller) genre that we are currently reading and our thoughts on them. Feel free to comment and leave suggestions as to what we should read and review next.

Authour:faceoff
Edited by David Baldacci
Format:
Advance Reader Copy, 444 pages
Publication date:
June 3rd 2014
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:
What do you get when you add two well known thriller writers together along with some of their well known characters all in one story? For countless fans of thrillers it would probably be a dream come true. For someone like me who ordinarily isn’t the biggest fan of thriller fiction, it was an eye opener to the different possibilities the genre has to offer. Even before I read this book, the concept alone was enough to know that I needed to review this book on my blog.

There are eleven stories in this collection, which is edited by David Baldacci a writer who is quite well known in his own right. Each chapter features a different collaboration between two well-known thriller writers, and starts off with an introduction that tells the reader about the two writers the characters they choose to include in the story, an explanation as to why the authours were paired up and finally in some instances we get a behind the scenes glimpse of the whole writing, collaboration and thought processes. I found these introductions extremely informative as well as a helpful guide to the characters which in turn enhanced my reading experience as there were only like three characters in this entire collection that I was familiar with. The introductions also showed that much thought was put into the pairings which made me appreciate this collection even more as the pairings worked extremely well for the on the whole.

Taken as a whole, FaceOff had me slowly changing my mind reconsidering trying out more thrillers though nothing too scary. There was a variety in the types of thriller stories in this collection from super creepy to bone chilling to fast paced procedurals, which is excellent for those who want to dip their toes into the thriller genre as it introduces readers to various different characters and from these stand alone stories you can decide based on the characters which series you would like want to pick up next. I know that after reading this collection, the list of thriller novels I want to read has grown substantially as I know I want to read more books with Patrick Kenzie, Malachi and Repairman Jack in them. All are interesting but remarkably different and unique characters who make this collection a highly recommended read for all.

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Mystery Mondays: Saints of the Shadow Bible by Ian Rankin

Mystery Mondays

Mystery Mondays is a sometimes weekly, sometimes biweekly and sometimes monthly review feature here on Words of Mystery that showcases books in the mystery (and on occasion thriller) genre that we are currently reading and our thoughts on them. Feel free to comment and leave suggestions as to what we should read and review next.

Authour:shadowbible
Ian Rankin
Series:
Inspector Rebus #19
Format:
Hardcover, 352 pages
Publication date:
November 7th 2013
Publisher:
Orion
Source:
Own copy

Synopsis:

Rebus and Malcolm Fox go head-to-head when a 30-year-old murder investigation resurfaces, forcing Rebus to confront crimes of the past

Rebus is back on the force, albeit with a demotion and a chip on his shoulder. He is investigating a car accident when news arrives that a case from 30 years ago is being reopened. Rebus’s team from those days is suspected of helping a murderer escape justice to further their own ends.

Malcolm Fox, in what will be his last case as an internal affairs cop, is tasked with finding out the truth. Past and present are about to collide in shocking and murderous fashion. What does Rebus have to hide? And whose side is he really on? His colleagues back then called themselves “The Saints,” and swore a bond on something called the Shadow Bible. But times have changed and the crimes of the past may not stay hidden much longer — and may also play a role in the present, as Scotland gears up for a referendum on independence.

Allegiances are being formed, enemies made, and huge questions asked. Who are the saints and who the sinners? And can the one ever become the other?

Review:

“Were you never in a gang at school? Maybe you were shunned, kept on the outside, looking in?” (p. 83)

After having recently read Ian Rankin’s Standing in Another Man’s Grave which I liked but didn’t love, I still could not see what all the fuss was about when it came to the Inspector Rebus series. However after reading Saints of the Shadow Bible, I am officially a fan.

At the start of the book, readers find out that although Rebus is back to working actual cases in Criminal Investigation Department (CID), he has been demoted to Detective Sergeant. Siobhan Clarke who had been a Detective Sergeant when he was a Detective Inspector is now a Detective Inspector. This reversal of roles is a bit humorous as Clarke still thinks highly of Rebus and does not treat him as inferior to her position. I actually really enjoyed the dynamics of relationship and friendship between the two which often consists of playful teasing between Rebus and Clarke.

Though the book started off slow for me, I did eventually get really into the mystery and the potential conspiracy aspect of the novel involving a group of police officer known as the “Saints of the Shadow Bible” whom Rebus worked with when he was starting out. I found it admirable how Rebus was still “loyal” to the “Saints of Shadow Bible” even if he did betray one of them in another way and even though if you read the book you will find out the deeper reason for his “loyalty”.

I was surprised that I actually found Rebus a more likeable and sympathetic as a result of this book. On the other hand while I relay liked Fox in Standing in Another Man’s Grave I was surprised that I didn’t really like his character as much in Saints of the Shadow Bible although I think it may have to do with the fact that more of Rebus’ perspective was show and we are given less insight into what Fox thinks in this book. On the whole what I liked the most about Saints of the Shadow Bible was seeing Fox and Rebus working together even if Rebus wasn’t completely on Fox’s side at first and even though in reality they were working against each other. However they both have own unique strengths and when they come together they are able to complete their goal. I would recommend this book to those who are fans of either Malcolm Fox or John Rebus or even both.

If you like this book, you’ll love: Standing in Another Man’s Grave by Ian Rankin.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5 Stars

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.