Book Review | Dear Emma by Katie Heaney

emmaAuthour:
Katie Heaney
Format:
Advance Reader Copy, 303 pages
Publication date:
March 1st 2016
Publisher:
Grand Central Publishing
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:
Having read Never Have I Ever: My Life (So Far) Without a Date and enjoyed it I was curious to see how Katie Heaney would approach fiction. Furthermore, the fact that the book was set in college meant that the characters would be closer in age to me and therefore extra relatable. Although a work of fiction, I believe Dear Emma shares a few similarities with Katie Heaney’s first book which was a memoir of sorts. What the two books have in common, is that both appear to be tributes to female friendships. When it comes to Dear Emma if you are looking for a book with romance in it, then you’re best looking elsewhere. The focus of Dear Emma remains truly on female friendships and college life.

What’s intriguing with Dear Emma is that not only did the author say it was inspired by Jane Austen’s Emma (albeit incredibly loosely) in addition it was also inspired by the authour’s own college experiences. As a result, it was incredibly relatable and it made me nostalgic for my university days. And sure I didn’t live away from home or near my school however I had several friends who did and the stories I’ve heard from resemble the lives of Harriet, and. That’s probably why this book resonated with me, it wasn’t too long ago that I was hanging out with my friends in one of the school’s cafeterias and/or getting together for study group sessions.

To be honest, not much happens in Dear Emma. There remains a bit of relationship drama here and there however it was only in tiny doses. I did however appreciate the fact that Harriet had her own column in her college’s newspaper as I loved reading her reactions to the letters/emails she gets in addition to how her personal life slowly collides with her “private” work life.

Dear Emma is definitely a book that could make several of us nostalgic for our postsecondary days. After all as Dear Emma demonstrates, college is a time that you may or may not find the love of your life however it’s more likely that you’ll form some memorable friendships that will have a lasting impact on you instead.

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | Poles Apart by Terry Fallis

polesapartAuthour:
Terry Fallis
Format:
Advance Reader Copy
Publication date:
October 20th 2015
Publisher:
Douglas Gibson Books
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:
I’ve always considered myself to be a feminist, and after hearing that Terry Fallis’ fifth novel features a feminist blogger, I attempted to acquire an early copy of his book to read and review for this blog. Fortunately the Fourth Annual Ontario Book Blogger Meet granted me the opportunity to pick up an advance reader of Poles Apart which I promptly started almost immediately after I had it in my possession.

For those of you who aren’t familiar with Terry Fallis, he’s a Canadian writer who is known for his hilarious novels. In his latest novel, Poles Apart he tells a different type of tale as we follow Everett Kane an aspiring writer who ends up creating the feminist blog, Eve of Equality that becomes viral. As a fellow blogger, I loved that I could relate to several of the tools and strategies that Everett employs as he creates and maintains his blog. (With the exception of my blog becoming viral) Additionally, I discovered several useful tips for bloggers that I was unaware of before reading Poles Apart. Furthermore, while I was unable to connect to most of the characters in the book I did enjoy the character development that Everett’s dad undergoes though the course of the novel.

Overall, Poles Apart touches upon an extremely vital issue which is how men can also participate in the fight for equality between sexes. And I believe Terry Fallis illustrates this point brilliantly in the character of Everett “Eve” Kane as one of the reasons that Eve refuses to come forward as the creator of the feminist blog is that he doesn’t believe he’ll be accepted and he doesn’t feel that as a man he should be the face of feminism. However, in the conclusion the novel does an excellent job of showing how everybody can be a part of the fight for women’s rights. Thus, while I cannot say that Poles Apart is my favourite Terry Fallis novel (that title still belongs to No Relations) I can however say that it is a cleverly written and entertaining novel that is absolutely worth checking out.

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.