Book Review | Loveboat, Taipei by Abigail Hing Wen

Authour:
Abigail Hing Wen
Format:
ARC
Publication date:
January 7th 2020
Publisher:
HarperTeen
Publisher Social Media: 
Twitter/Facebook/SavvyReader/
Source:
Received from publisher

Review:
I love exchanges, especially ones where my travel expenses are mostly covered, so I would have killed to have the opportunity that was forced upon Everett aka “Ever” by her parents. Fortunately with Loveboat, Taipei I felt I was right by Ever’s side experiencing her culture and “freedom” from her parents for the first time.

Those who are children of immigrant parents, myself included will find that they are able to relate to at least part of Ever’s story and the pressure and guilt trips she faces from her parents, especially her mother. While my brother and I were never pressured by my parents to become doctors, we both were “encouraged” to pick “safe” majors and careers. This may be why I couldn’t help be root for Ever, as it was clear that she was incredibly passionate about dance and that it was obvious that this was what she was meant to do.

In addition to Ever, we are also introduced to Rick and Sophie who are cousins as well as Xavier, who at first glance appears to be your typical wealthy, playboy. In Abigail Hing Wen’s hands these teens become more than your ordinary character archetypes. For instance Xavier’s life isn’t perfect and he actually hides a sensitive and caring side while Sophie, who befriends Ever has her own issues and isn’t just a fun, ditzy, cheerleader who only exists to support Ever. Both Xavier and Sophie have their own problems and agendas and they’re not immune to reacting and taking action in the heat of the moment. The same can be said for Rick who is seen as the “golden boy”, while it’s true that compared to the others, he has a charmed life it’s not without its own stresses that mostly come from his family’s disapproval of his girlfriend as well as her dependence on him.

As with any excellent contemporary YA novel, there is both drama and romance in Loveboat, Taipei. I knew from the start who I wanted to end up together and since I was satisfied with the romance so I did not mind the love triangle. That being said, I do believe that since Loveboat, Taipei tried to tackle countless serious topics at once including parental pressure and guilt, mental illness, harassment, leaking of nude images, parental abuse and abandonment they often weren’t addressed properly due to lack of space and time in the book. Furthermore, with the drama I felt like some characters got off too easily for example, Sophie who I felt was quickly forgiven for her actions. While I was sympathetic to her character I did not fully buy into her “redemption” and wished she faced more consequences.

Loveboat, Taipei actually lived up to my expectations. The story was perfectly paced and the writing flow well. It also made me tear up a few times while warming my heart at other times. Sure there was plenty of drama, as expected when you have a large group of young people who are free from their usual family obligation and responsibilities, I personally found that the amount of drama was just enough to keep readers invested in the characters and the story.

Taiwan was never high on my travel bucket list, however having lived vicariously through Ever’s adventures I may be reconsidering it as a travel destination. I can’t wait for the next book and I am crossing my fingers that it will focus more on Sophie or Xavier or even both of them!!

 

 

 

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | Scavenge the Stars by Tara Sim

Authour:
Tara Sim
Format:
ARC
Publication date:
January 7th 2020
Publisher:
Disney Hyperion
Source:
Received from publisher

Review:
In this gender bent retelling of the classic novel, The Count of Monte Cristo the “Count” is now a fierce and cunning young girl named Amaya Chandra who goes infiltrates the wealthy circles of Moray as the Countess Yamaa to get revenge

Scavenge the Stars was a compelling take on both the “girl gets revenge” trope and The Count of Monte Cristo. However, while I can appreciate the fact that Amaya was unskilled as she was still just a teen, I wish her motivation for revenge was more personal as it would have made for a more compelling story. Still, I did love her character’s journey. The same can’t be said about Cayo, I’m not sure what other characters saw in him, other than his family name and him supposedly being attractive but I was not a fan. Although, I did find his devotion to his sister admirable. As for the rest of the cast of characters, I liked the children who helped Amaya on her revenge request, though I felt like they weren’t truly fleshed out. Same with the villains in the book, they seemed like straight forward “scoundrels” which is unfortunate as I wish the conflict was more “grey” and Boon and Kamon Mercado had more redeeming qualities since the “heroes” in Scavenge the Stars definitely had their flaws.

While the plot, pacing and writing were solid for the majority of the novel, I felt that towards the end the story began to lose momentum and it did not pick up again until the last pages of the book. That being said, the ending did slightly redeem the story as the new twists introduced that are connected to the larger geography and politics in book’s world has me looking forward to the next book in this duology. So, if you’re looking for a well written, more diverse revenge story and do not mind the lack of romance or somewhat messy world building then consider picking up Scavenge the Stars.

 

 

 

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | The Art of Making Memories by Meik Wiking

Authour:
Meik Wiking
Format:
Hardcover
Publication date:
October 1, 2019
Publisher:
Penguin Canada
Source:
Received from publisher

Review:
I discovered there was a new Meik Wiking book when I came across his article on the creating happier travel memories for Afar Magazine’s website. Before The Art of Making Memories, I’ve read every one of Meik Wiking’s books. The Little Book of Hygge has a special place in my heart however, I also enjoyed The Little Book of Lykke.

I loves finding new ways to capture my travel memories I was excited to pick up The Art of Making Memories in hopes of picking up more tips. Unfortunately, I found The Art of Making Memories not as entertaining or useful as Wiking’s other books. There is a ton of research mostly from psychological studies that he used to back up his observations. Unfortunately, the majority of the book felt overshadowed by all the research Wiking cites. Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy reading about the psychology behind various subjects, however as a former psychology major the bulk of what he has to say in this book felt redundant to what I learned in my courses.

Thus, in spite of this book containing Wiking’s signature dry wit and humour along with numerous gorgeous photographs all in colour, The Art of Making Memories did not capture my attention or interest compared with his last two books. Nevertheless there were a few excellent takeaways from the book which were:

  • Treat happy moments like a first date and actually pay attention to them, thus making them more memorable to you.
  • Visit a new place at least once a year, it doesn’t have to be far and can just be somewhere simple and local.
  • Rename places that are special to you by referring them to a happy memory.

The Art of Making Memories is perfect for the person who is interested in learning how to improve their memory in general or if they are just truly interested in connecting happiness research with psychology this one may appeal to them. However, you may also enjoy it if you are a diehard fan Meik Wiking’s work and want his latest to add to your collection.

 

 

 

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | The Map from Here to There by Emery Lord

Authour:
Emery Lord
Format:
eGalley
Publication date:
January 7th 2020
Publisher:
Bloomsbury YA
Source:
Received from publisher

Review:
The Start of Me and You was probably my least favourite of Emery Lord’s books nevertheless I still loved the book and Paige and her friends so I was beyond excited when a sequel was announced!

The Map from Here to There picks up a few months after the events of The Start of Me and You, Paige is working at her local movie theater for the summer and excited for her boyfriend, Max’s return. Readers may want to re-read The Start of Me and You again along with the bonus chapter as a refresher is definitely recommended before diving into this book. One of the reasons I found it difficult to dive into this book initially was as I couldn’t remember everything that happened in the first book. However, once I remembered I did enjoy being back in the world of Paige and her group of friends.

The romance in this book was another matter. Paige and Max are no longer in the honeymoon phase of their relationship. The cracks are starting to form and while I appreciated how their relationship goes through the challenges that I’m sure countless couples in their last year of high school faced, I can’t help but feel that the majority of their conflict was just created to add drama and excitement to the story. Furthermore, I was a bit disappointed that they barely interacted with each other once Max came back, although this probably was why they encountered the problems that they did. Nonetheless, I did like where we leave them in the end.

What I liked about The Map from Here to There was its accurate portrayal of the struggle teens face when it comes to anxiety and senior year of high school in addition to thinking about what comes next. I also loved the correspondences between Max and Paige as those sections were probably the best part of the book.

If I’m being honest, my main complaint would be that not much happens in this book. Compared to Emery Lord’s other books, the pacing for The Map from Here to There was a great deal slower, and other than the relationship drama not much else happens in this book. The book also ends on a rather abrupt albeit hopeful note, and while it would have been nice to see what school, Paige ended up picking it was realistic for her not to have yet decided by the end of the book. So perhaps my expectations for this book were over the top, but The Map from Here to There was a bit of a letdown. And while I am curious to see where the gang ends up, I’m not sure I need read another book about Paige.

 

 

 

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | 10 Blind Dates by Ashley Elston

Authour:
Ashley Elston
Format:
ARC
Publication date:
October 1st 2019
Publisher:
Disney-Hyperion
Source:
Received from publisher.

Review:
Ashley Elston’s 10 Blind Dates may be the perfect read for you if you’re a fan of those Hallmark Christmas movies about family and love! Taking place over the winter holiday break, 10 Blind Dates follows Sophie tries to get over a recent heartbreak by letting the members of her large, Italian family set her up on ten blind dates. What follows is an entertaining concept with some crazy competitiveness and bets and of course a bit of chaos and hijinks.

Given the premise and title, boys and romance are a major part of Sophie’s story. However, I loved that the core of the book was about Sophie reconnecting with her cousins and her extended family. As a person who growing up was incredibly close with her cousins and who is not as close with them now, it made me nostalgic for my childhood. Furthermore, I also enjoyed seeing Sophie’s relationship with her sister, Margot and it was obvious how their close bond was even if they mostly interacted through texting.

As for the actual romance subplot of the book, I’m satisfied with where we leave Sophie though the romance wasn’t necessary in my opinion. 10 Blind Dates is mainly about Sophie going out and having fun, and forgetting about her heartbreak. And this works all too well, especially as all her adventures are documented online, catching the attention of her ex. I’m just glad that there was no backsliding on Sophie’s end when it came to her ex.

A light, and incredibly fluffy read 10 Blind Dates did not stand out as a particularly unique or special read for me. However, it does have a great deal of heart and if you like stories with large, close-knit families then you’ll probably enjoy this one.

 

 

 

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | Song of the Crimson Flower by Julie C. Dao

Authour:
Julie C. Dao
Format:
ARC
Publication date:
November 5th 2019
Publisher:
Philomel
Source:
Received from publisher

Review:
Here’s the thing, fantasy has never been a genre that I gravitated towards. That being said, I never knew how much I wanted a Vietnamese YA fantasy world novel with characters who have actual Vietnamese names until I read Julie C. Dao’s Song of the Crimson Flower.

Having read Kingdom of the Blazing Phoenix, I was excited to return to the same gorgeous world again and see how Jade and Koichi are faring. I also loved how Commander Wei’s role was hilariously foreshadowed when the father of the heroine, Lan tells her she can visit the Gray City if she somehow convinces the Commander of the Great Forest to escort her there. Of course it was also interesting to see the mythology and world expanded from the previous books in addition to how things have changed a couple of years after the events the Kingdom of the Blazing Phoenix.

However, the central plot of Song of the Crimson Flower is Lan and Bao’s story. I was looking forward to their love story and while I wish the romance was better developed, particularly on Lan’s part I did find their relationship to be sweet. When it came to other parts of the story I was a bit disappointed. The antagonist, Madame Vy wasn’t fully realized as a serious threat or even as a character. She had the potential to be a major villain, but instead was relegated to the background for the majority of the book. Actually, I was also slightly disappointed that even though the stakes could have been high, they truly weren’t in the end as all major conflicts and battles were swiftly dealt with off-screen. So as much as I enjoyed Bao and Lan’s story, I would have preferred that we had at least a glimpse of the main battle that took place as there was so much hype surrounding the battle/war.

As a companion book to both Kingdom of the Blazing Phoenix and Forest of a Thousand Lanterns, Song of the Crimson Flower is more of a love story set in a fantasy world and not a full on fantasy novel. Therefore, it is not necessary to have read the other books to enjoy this standalone novel. Still, without a doubt I would say that my enjoyment for Song of the Crimson Flower exceeded that of Kingdom of the Blazing Phoenix. Having recently returned from a trip to Huế which was one the capital of the Nguyen Dynasty as well as the Đàng Trong Kingdom, I was able to better appreciate the rich setting and characters in this book. Beautifully written though not incredibly action packed, Song of the Crimson Flower may be more suited to those who are looking to dip their toes into the fantasy genre rather than for fans of true high or epic fantasy.

 

 

 

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Mystery Monday | A Better Man by Louise Penny

Mystery Mondays is an occasional review feature here on Words of Mystery that showcases books in the mystery (and on occasion thriller) genre that we are currently reading and our thoughts on them. Feel free to comment and leave suggestions as to what we should read and review next.

Who is it by? Louise Penny is a former journalist and radio host with the CBC. The authour of the best selling Chief Inspector Gamache series, A Better Man is her 15th book in the Inspector Gamache series. She currently lives in a small village south of Montreal with her dog, Bishop.

What is it about? Gamache is back as head of the homicide department, a job he shares with his former second-in-command, Jean-Guy Beauvoir. In what may be the pair’s final case, a father approaches Gamache for help in finding his daughter who has gone missing. As more details about the woman’s condition and marriage come tonight,  the case becomes a more personal one to both men. Meanwhile a flood is hitting the pronvince and not even Three Pines is being spared, and Gamache once again finds himself being attacked this time on social media for his past mistakes.

Where does it take place? Once again the story is set both within the village of Three Pines as well as the

Why did I like it? I’ve loved most of the Inspector Gamache books that I’ve read with very few exceptions. However, A Better Man took a bit longer to sink back into. The case was a compelling one, although I think part of the reason it took me so long to get invested was because for the majority of the book the team was so laser focused on one suspect that they weren’t truly opened to any other possibilities. This made the reveal a bit of a surprise at the end, because in any other instance, you would have considered looking into that person as a suspect along with everyone else. That being said, Penny does excel at building suspense and the central mystery was laid out in a manner that entice me to keep on reading. Far from being my favourite book in the series, I did appreciate how the book never sugar-coated the mistakes the characters make and the consequences of their actions and obstacles they must face even as they strive to move forward and be a better person.

 When did it come out? August 27, 2019

 

 

 

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Mystery Monday | A Dangerous Engagement by Ashley Weaver

Mystery Mondays is an occasional review feature here on Words of Mystery that showcases books in the mystery (occasionally  thriller) genre that I am currently reading and my thoughts on them. Feel free to comment and leave suggestions as to what I should read and review next.

Who is it by? Ashley Weaver is the Technical Services Coordinator for the Allen Parish Libraries, having had her starting working as a page at the age of 14. Her Amory Ames series features a wealthy young woman who with a bit of help from her husband, Milo is also an amateur detective. A Dangerous Engagement is the sixth Amory Ames Mystery novel. She now lives in Oakdale, Louisiana.

What is it about? Amory Ames is looking forward to being a bridesmaid at her childhood friend Tabitha’s wedding. However upon her arrival things are not as she thought they’d be, what with all the secrets everyone seems to be having as well as all the unspoken tension. Things take a darker turn when one of the groomsmen is found murdered on the front steps of the Tabitha’s home. Word is the murder victim may have had ties to the glamorous, dangerous world of both bootleggers and the mob but who really killed him? Not one to shy away from a murder, Amory finds herself drawn into finding the truth and getting justice once again.

Where does it take place? New York City in the 1930s.

Why did I like it? I wasn’t sure what to expect with this series as A Dangerous Engagement is my first Amory Ames book. However, I was intrigued by the premise as well as the time period. Fortunately Ashley Weaver, did not let me down! Both the writing and the characters were charming from the start, and I enjoyed the build up to the mystery. The pacing of the book was also perfect for a noir mystery. On the other hand, the relationship between Amory and Milo made me pause at times. However it’s clear that they’re very much in love with one another and that their past struggle has made them stronger as a couple. That being said, I’m not sure how they’ll fare as parents down the road, but it would be interesting to see. Other than that, I adore all the other references to 1930s New York in the book, including the Prohibition, jazz singers and gangsters what with the notorious Leon De Lora being one of my favourite characters in the book. I appreciated how he was far from being a one-dimensional character. So, if you like cozy, historical mysteries featuring a female sleuth, then give this one a shot!

When did it come out? September 3, 2019

 

 

 

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | Frankly in Love by David Yoon

Authour:
David Yoon
Format:
ARC
Publication date:
September 10th 2019
Publisher:
G.P. Putnam’s Sons Books for Young Readers
Source:
Received from publisher.

Review:
Boy loves girl, another girl loves  another boy but the people they love would never be someone their parents would consider “appropriate”. So what do they do? They pretend to date each other as a way to sneak out with their less appropriate aka Non-Korean significant others. This is an unfortunate but not unheard of dilemma for kids of immigrants and if this were any other YA novel, you’d probably guess what happens next. However, Frankly in Love has its own unique twist on what could go wrong for these teens. 

As a child of Asian immigrants, I relished in the realness of the issues and conflict related to both race and class that Frank and his parents deal with both within their family as well as with the other families in their “community”. It was also refreshing to directly show how the generational gaps between all the parents and their kids in the book can lead to major conflicts between both groups and this book does not shy away from the fact the immigrant parents can be just as problematic, racist and buy into harmful cultural stereotypes as much as any other American. Nor does it shy away from the challenges of dating outside of your race. Furthermore, I love that I could relate to so many of Frank’s experiences, growing up as a teenager stuck between two cultures. This includes having “friends” that I only hung out with when we saw each other at one of our parents’ houses as well as being annoyed when I’m asked to order “ethnic” foods at an Asian restaurant for acquaintances and coworkers who are not Asian and are usually White.

In addition to the complicated family dynamics, I liked the friendships in the book. The bromance between Frank and Q was incredibly heartwarming and Joy and Frank start off as being causal friends before their circumstances bring them closer. I also applaud how realistic this book was when it came to the challenges of being a senior in high school and how not all relationships can handle what comes after high school. So while normally, I’m not a fan of more realistic YA much less YA narrated by a guy I did find Frankly in Love to be an enjoyable, well-written, and thoughtful albeit slightly bittersweet coming of age story.

 

 

 

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | The Downstairs Girl by Stacey Lee

Authour:
Stacey Lee
Format:
ARC
Publication date:
August 13th 2019
Publisher:
Putnam
Source:
Received from publisher.

Review:
Stacey Lee is a fairly well-known name when it comes to young adult fiction. Not only is she a writer of historical young adult fiction, she is also one of the founders of the We Need Diverse Books movement and non-profit organization. 

With The Downstairs Girl, Lee takes us to Atlanta, Georgia in the late 1800s. I’m sure I’m not the only reader to be surprised to learn that Chinese workers were shipped to the South to replace the field Black slaves after slavery was abolished. It was interesting read about the experience of the Chinese in America in the late 1800s as more often than not, their contributions and experience are left out of the mainstream history textbooks.

The Downstairs Girl works as it is obvious a ton of research was done to ensure that the story was historically accurate. This was obvious with portrayal of the major issues during this time including racism and the suffrage movement. It doesn’t shy away from the fact that the white women leading the suffragist were only interested in rights for (white) women, and they did not feel the need to consider intersectionality in their fight for women’s rights even though Black women like Noemi in the book were instrumental in the suffrage movement. Still I liked the female characters and their interactions and relationships in the book, and I appreciated how plucky both Jo and Noemi were. Furthermore, without spoiling too much, I loved the relationship Jo has with Old Gin who raised her and taught her everything she loves about horses. 

The Downstairs Girl has all the makings of a decent historical fiction read. That being said, even with its distinctive characters and unique premise and setting I wasn’t completely sold on it. For one, I could have done without the romance in the book, and I also felt that parts of the story dragged. Still the book feels truly authentic and gives readers new insight into the suffragists and the South on top of the Chinese experience in the South in 1860s America.

 

 

 

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Blog Tour | There Will Come A Darkness by Katy Rose Pool

Authour:
Katy Rose Pool
Format:
ARC
Publication date:
September 3th 2019
Publisher:
Henry Holt and Co.
Source:
Received from publisher

Review:
Katy Rose Pool’s début novel, There Will Come a Darkness truly does live up to its ominous title. Set in a rich, diverse world that mixes elements of both ancient mythology and apocalyptic fiction, this book follows five extremely different people who all make reckless choices and the consequences that follow.

Of the five my favourite character was Hassan, the exiled prince and someone who doesn’t have a Grace. It was satisfying to see him come into his own as a leader, and I’m looking forward to see him become a more competent leader for his people, especially after facing some major setbacks and betrayal in There Will Come a Darkness. Meanwhile, though I initially liked Ephyra because she was more of an anti-villain with somewhat sympathetic motives, her decisions and actions near the end became more annoying as she started to care more about her own comfort over what was best for her sister. I am however looking forward to getting to know Beru better as she’s finally taking charge of her own life.

I love a compelling heist/team novel and this one was action packed and fast-paced. I also appreciated how well-developed the world was and the diversity of the interpersonal relationships between the characters. The descriptions of everything were incredibly vivid and the characters truly came to life through Pool’s writing. That being said, while the writing was gripping the story had several twists that made everything darker than I thought it would be. It was a bit heartbreaking how for the majority of the characters, things just kept getting worse and worse with little to no reprieve for them. I do feel like there come have been a better balance between all the angst and darkness with the additional of a few more light-hearted moments.

For the most part, There Will Come a Darkness wasn’t too unpredictable though it did have its tiny surprises. I’m not sure if I’ll be picking up the next book as I’m a bit nervous about what will happen next however I am curious to see Hassan grow into more of a leader and to see where Beru, Jude, Anton and even Ephyra end up next.

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | This Time Will Be Different by Misa Sugiura

Authour:
Misa Sugiura
Format:
ARC
Publication date:
June 4th 2019
Publisher:
HarperTeen
Publisher Social Media: 
Twitter/Facebook/SavvyReader/
Source:
Received from publisher.

Review:
Every so often, when I’m stuck between two ARCs I turn to social media to help me decide what to read next. Misa Sugiura’s sophomore novel, This Time Will Be Different was the winner of a recent poll I had.

CJ Katsuyama is a Japanese-American teenager who lives with her mother, a high-powered executive and her aunt who runs the family flower shop. While there are countless things CJ isn’t sure of, the one thing she is sure of is that she loves working on floral arrangements with her aunt. So, when she learns that the family shop is being sold to a descendant of the man who cheated her family during World War II she decides to do something about it.

There are two things that I loved about This Time Will Be Different. The first was how relatable CJ was as a teenager, I found it refreshing that she was cynical when it came to matters of the heart as a result of her family’s complicated love history. Still it was nice to have a character be jaded when it comes to love yet still root for others and have crushes. I also appreciated how in the end CJ’s hasn’t been completely changed, she is open to love but not overly sentimental about it. The other thing I loved was the strong women in CJ’s life, I also liked how it the book highlights how CJ feels pressured as a teen to be amazing, especially seeing how well her mother has done for herself as a single and working parent.

This Time Will Be Different was an unexpected read for me, but in a positive way. It started off as a slow read for me, and initially I was only interested in learning more about CJ’s past as it was more interesting than her present day situation. However, I came away learning so much about the language and meaning of flowers in addition to the history of Asian Americans, particularly the Japanese and of the origins of the “model minority” myth. Even though all of this felt like an enormous information dump and at times the placement of these sections affected the pacing of the novel, I still was grateful that it gave me the context to critically look at CJ’s story.

An emotionally resonant story about family, community, and activism This Time Will Be Different shows that real life and people cannot be simplified into good or bad and that history can bring complications even several generations later.

 

 

 

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | Natalie Tan’s Book of Luck and Fortune by Roselle Lim

Authour:
Roselle Lim
Format:
ARC
Publication date:
June 11th 2019
Publisher:
Berkley Books
Source:
Received from publisher.

Review:
Everyone knows what comfort food is, well Roselle Lim’s debut novel is what I call a comfort read. Natalie Tan’s Book of Luck and Fortune is just one of those reads that warm the heart, and provides a sense of nostalgia.

The story follows a young woman who returns to the neighbourhood, she grew morup in upon hearing of her mother’s death. When Natalie comes back home, she finds her once vibrant San Francisco neighbourhood dying, a shadow of what it once was. I found it interesting that the authour chose to tell Natalie’s story from first-person point of view. This helped me to further connect with Natalie’s personal history and story, including the father she never knew, and the mother who she was estranged from. Natalie’s story was more tragic than I initially thought, however I appreciated the complicated mother-daughter dynamics in the book. I also could relate to Natalie in more ways than one, especially her restlessness and wanderlust. Still, I admired how she fights for her dream and was able to make something of herself.

Along with this being a story of family, community and getting back to your roots, there is also romance in store for Natalie. Though if I were honest, the romance plot in the book didn’t genuinely work for me. The romance had its sweet moments but the development was too fast and the circumstances were too rooted in fantasy and not realistic for me to enjoy. Fortunately, it was not the main focus of Natalie’s story.

Still, there’s definitely something magical about Natalie Tan’s Book of Luck and Fortune, and I’m not saying that due to the magical realism elements of Natalie’s story. Roselle Lim’s writing truly brings the world that she created to life. The descriptions of all the food is so vivid and mouth-watering that it made me hungry. This is one novel you shouldn’t read on an empty stomach! Luckily, there are recipes in the book and while I may not be much of a cook, I now want to try them out for myself.

Touching on topics like mental illness, and estrangement between mothers and daughters, Natalie Tan’s Book of Luck and Fortune was not the light and fluffy read I thought it would be. It is however, a read that is as enchanting as its cover promises.

 

 

 

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | There’s Something About Sweetie by Sandhya Menon

Authour:
Sandhya Menon
Format:
eGalley
Publication date:
May 14th 2019
Publisher:
Simon Pulse
Source:
Received from publisher.

Review:
We first met Ashish in When Dimple Met Rishi as Ashish is Rishi’s little brother. There’s Something about Sweetie continues Ashish’s story and introduces us to the sassy Sweetie Nair. I’ll be honest, despite my excitement for this book I was a bit wary. The plot of There’s Something about Sweetie meant that Ashish and Celia would no longer be a couple and I loved them as the beta couple in When Dimple Met Rishi. In spite of that, Sweetie quickly won me over and I truly felt that she and Ashish were the perfect foil to one another. 

This was a book that had me grinning from ear to ear, of course, there were a few (joyful) tears as I love how authentically both characters’ families were portrayed. As a child of immigrants, I could definitely relate to Sweetie’s conflict about wanting to be her own person and not giving in to familial pressure yet at the same time not being able to fully go against her parents. After all, even if you disagree with them their words still have an effect on you because they’re your parents and you want them to accept and love you for who you are. I also loved how this was a YA novel where families, especially parents play such an integral part in a teenager’s life. However, I also love how both Sweetie and Ashish’s friends are heavily featured in this book, especially as they are all such fun characters who always have each other’s’ backs. Furthermore, it was amazing how a couple of Ashish’s friends, even got their own subplot and character development moments.

Ashish truly has come a long way since his first appearance and I love how Sweetie grows, although her character doesn’t change a great deal. Perhaps this due to the fact that she was shown as being perfect with her only flaw being her struggling between standing up for herself and being a dutiful daughter? It’s hard for anyone to not fall in love with her. A delightful read, There’s Something about Sweetie is one of those books that’s guaranteed to put you in a good mood with its adorableness, lack of any major angst and message of loving yourself and opening yourself up to others.

 

 

 

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | Somewhere Only We Know by Maurene Goo

Authour:
Maurene Goo
Format:
ARC
Publication date:
May 7th 2019
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR)
Source:
Received from publisher.

Review:
For those who remember or are familiar with the movie, Roman Holiday starring Gregory Peck as a reporter and Audrey Hepburn as a princess looking for one day of freedom from her royal duties. Somewhere Only We Know modernizes this story by having it set in present day Hong Kong. I also like how Goo made the story her own by changing up the setting and making the two characters Asian American teenagers while still making nods to the book’s inspiration. The Hong Kong setting allows readers to visit another country and culture and experience Hong Kong from more of a local’s perspective, though with a sprinkling of the tourist highlights of course. I also felt that the pacing was actually perfect, especially for a story that supposedly takes place over less than two days at no point in the story did ever felt rushed. 

Somewhere Only We Know has two narrators, “Lucky” aka Fern (neither is her real name) and Jack. I found it refreshing that both were older teens as we watch them struggle to find their passion and decide what they want to do in life. I related to both characters’ pressure and stress over not letting others down, especially when they’ve made so countless sacrifices for you. I also appreciated how the parents, especially Jack’s parents weren’t your stereotypical strict, “tiger” parents. Since Jack’s story is told from his point of view, we only view his parents from his eyes. As a result, it was nice when he finally is able to talk to them and they’re able to clear up any misconceived notions he had about them. 

Finally central to Somewhere Only We Know is the relationship that gradually develops between Lucky and Jack. While there were a few clichéd moments that could be attributed to the K-drama feel of the book, their relationship like the characters themselves felt truly authentic. The romance wasn’t swoon worthy nor did it make me hardcore ship Lucky and Jack together. However, in the end I bought their connection and I’m satisfied with how both their story ends. 

A light read that isn’t all rainbows and sunshine, Somewhere Only We Know is still an entertaining read, especially for those who love K-dramas, or those who believe you can find love from a short, chance encounter.

 

 

 

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.