Waiting on Wednesday #23 | How to Be a Bawse: A Guide to Conquering Life by Lilly Singh

wed Waiting on Wednesday is a weekly meme that highlights upcoming titles that we’re looking forward to/dying to read. It is hosted by Jill at Breaking the Spine

bawse

Synopsis:

Lilly Singh isn’t just a superstar. She’s Superwoman—which is also the name of her wildly popular YouTube channel. Funny, smart, and insightful, the actress and comedian covers topics ranging from relationships to career choices to everyday annoyances. It’s no wonder she’s garnered more than a billion views. But Lilly didn’t get to the top by being lucky—she had to work for it. Hard.

Now Lilly wants to share the lessons she learned while taking the world by storm, and the tools she used to do it. How to Be a Bawse is the definitive guide to conquering life. Make no mistake, there are no shortcuts to success, personal or professional. World domination requires real effort, dedication, and determination. Just consider Lilly a personal trainer for your life—with fifty rules to get you in the game, including

• Let Go of FOMO: Temptation will try to steer you away from your goals. FOMO is just a test for your priorities, a test that a bawse is ready to pass.
• Be Nice to People: Treat niceness like a task on your daily to-do list. People will go out of their way to help and support you because you make them feel good.
• Schedule Inspiration: Lack of motivation isn’t permanent or a sign of weakness. Expect it and proactively schedule time to be creative.
• Be the Dumbest: Challenge yourself by surrounding yourself with people who know more than you do. It’s a vital way to learn and improve.

Told in Lilly’s hilarious, bold voice, and packed with photos and candid stories from her own journey to the top, How to Be a Bawse will make you love your life and yourself—even more than you love Beyoncé. (Yes, we said it!)

I’ll admit that I’m a latecomer to “Superwoman” and her YouTube videos (having just discovered her stuff last year), but once I discovered them I was hooked! She’s just so relatable and entertaining, and I love that we have the same alum mater from the same university program as well!

Having read some of her writing (from her New Year’s post) which I enjoyed, I’m definitely looking forward to this book and all the empowering messages and advice contained in it. Although, I’m most likely just going to get the audiobook rather than the physical book for How to Be a Bawse since its narrated by Lilly Singh herself.

What books are you “waiting” on this week?

Top Ten Tuesdays | Top Ten Best Books of 2016

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Book Review | Circling the Sun by Paula McLain

circlesunAuthour:
Paula McLain
Format:
Advance Reader Copy, 361 pages
Publication date:
July 28th 2015
Publisher:
Ballantine Books
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:
Before reading Paula McLain’s Circling the Sun, I wasn’t entirely familiar with who Beryl Markham was or what she did. Additionally, I was only vaguely familiar with the setting of Circling the Sun because of the movie, Out of Africa. Thus for those of you, who similar to me aren’t familiar with who Beryl Markham was, she was the first woman to successfully fly across the Atlantic from east to west. This in itself was an astonishing feat when you consider the time period she lived in on top of what the expected role of British women was during this era.

Though I never grew attached to or felt a connection to Beryl in the book, I did find her voice throughout the novel to have an authentic feel to it. The prose throughout the novel was breathtaking whether it was the descriptions of wildlife and nature or the descriptions of the feelings Beryl felt as she raced and trained horses and flew planes. Throughout it all, it felt as if I was right there beside her experiencing and witnessing all the events that the narrator was going through.

I suppose part of the reason the narrator’s voice in addition to the story in Circling the Sun felt incredibly authentic was probably for the reason that it was evident that the authour herself put an enormous amount of work and research into it. Having met and heard the authour speak with reference to her writing process, including how she travelled to Kenya to visit several of the sites that held a connection to Beryl Markham; it is obvious that this novel was a labour of love for her. Another interesting item was how the authour spoke on the subject of how she felt a connection to Beryl since both their moms left them when they were kids and came back into their lives when they were in their 20s.

Thus while Circling the Sun was an extremely well-written book, it wasn’t the book for me. As much as I adore historical fiction, I prefer novels that focus on character relationships. Circling the Sun however, appeared to focus more on Beryl’s career rather than her various relationships and romantic encounters which felt like they were glossed over to make Beryl the character to be a more likeable person than the real life Beryl had been. That being assumed, if you desire a historical read featuring a strong, independent woman you may consider picking up this book. And if you do decide to pick up this book, I’d also recommend you listen to the soundtrack to the Out of Africa movie as it truly adds to the reading experience.

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | The Dress Shop of Dreams by Menna van Praag

dressshopAuthour:
Menna van Praag
Format:
Trade Paperback, 326 pages
Publication date:
December 30th 2014
Publisher:
Ballantine Books
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:

“…if life is ever less than lovely, put on this dress and it’ll help you remember that you are loved. And that will see you through everything.” (p. 149)

When it comes to fiction, generally I am not the greatest fan of magical realism. Though, as is the case with most things there are always exceptions. The Dress Shop of Dreams is about a woman named Etta who owns a dress shop that isn’t your ordinary dress shop; instead the dresses in Etta’s store speak to her and bring magic to those who are ready and willing to accept them. The book also tells the stories both past and present of various other characters who are or become connected to either Etta or her grand-daughter, Cora.

Although there were several things in this book that were obvious to me such as the entire mystery behind Cora parents’ deaths, and other things that annoyed me slightly such as how weak willed a few of the characters were, The Dress Shop of Dreams was still an enjoyable read. I particularly loved the relationship between Cora and Etta in addition to the relationship between Cora and her parents when she was a child which is only seen in flashbacks. I loved how both her parents loved each other and their daughter, and how even though they loved their work and were extremely into their research, they never neglected their relationships.

All in all, The Dress Shop of Dreams is a magical story regarding the magic that words, books and clothes and the effects they can have on people. It is an uplifting, enchanting and heartwarming story that is ideal for winter holiday which was when I in reality read the book. Also for those who like their books to having an ending that ties up all the loose ends nicely, this book does just that. I am looking forward to Menna van Praag’s subsequent book which based on its preview included in this book looks like it will be a mysterious read concerning witches who are university professors.

If you like this book, you’ll love: The Emperor of Paris by C.S. Richardson

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | The One & Only by Emily Giffin

Authour:theone
Emily Giffin
Format:
Hardcover, 400 pages
Publication date:
May 20th 2014
Publisher:
Ballantine Books
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:

“Then again, I know it’s not the win itself, but everything that went into the victory.” (p. 413)

Emily Giffin is such an amazing authour and I have always loved her books for the reason that the characters are usually incredibly relatable. And I also just love reading her stories and seeing how they unfold is she is a gifted storyteller when it comes to women and relationships. Giffin’s latest book, The One & Only is about Shea Rigsby, a thirty something woman who thinks she has her life all figured out until a tragedy close to her makes her realizes that she doesn’t. The rest of the book is about her journey of finding out what she truly wants in life.

One of the things that I found was extremely different in The One & Only versus Giffin’s previous novels, is how there is a lot of football talk in the book given the setting of the book it made sense but for someone who isn’t incredibly into football or any sports for that matter, it was difficult to immerse myself in that aspect of the story at times.

While overall I liked the writing style and the story, I had a few issues with the book. The first one is a bit of a nitpick, but I found it annoying how Coach Clive Carr was always be referred to in the book as “coach”, in fact there were times I forgot his name was actually Clive. And while I get that being a football “coach” is a major part of his identity, I wish Giffin used his name more in the book. On the other hand, while I found it weird that Coach Carr called Shea “girl”, it did not annoy me as much as the whole “coach” thing. Secondly the thing that I had a bigger issue with was the romantic that was the endgame. Without giving away too much (I hope), I found that relationship to have a major power imbalance which made me feel a little weirded out, especially as I was trying to imagine how I would react if one of my friends had a romantic relationship like the one that Shea ends up in.

In the end however, I think there is a one important message that this book gives to readers, which is if there is something you want, then you should strive for it no matter what anyone says, because if you try and succeed then perhaps its meant to be. And if you try and fail then perhaps it was not meant to be. All in all, The One & Only was a decent read that touches upon some extremely serious topics. And while I still sort of like her other books a bit more, I would recommend The One & Only to those who are diehard Emily Giffin fans or diehard football fans or both.

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.