Mystery Monday | The Awkward Squad by Sophie Hénaff

Mystery Mondays is an occasional review feature here on Words of Mystery that showcases books in the mystery (occasionally  thriller) genre that I am currently reading and my thoughts on them. Feel free to comment and leave suggestions as to what I should read and review next.

Who is it by? Sophie Hénaff is a French author and  journalist, known for humorous column, “La Cosmopolite” in the Cosmopolitan. The Awkward Squad is her first novel to be translated into English and it is the first book in her Awkward Squad / Anne Capstan series.

What is it about? Anne Capstan, a police officer with a promising future finds herself suddenly in charge of a new squad of misfits after recent events had her coming off as a bit too “trigger happy”. Whole officially the new team was created to work on cold cases, in reality her new squad consists of various misfits whom H.Q. is unable to fire but doesn’t want to deal with. But as this mismatched crew starts woking on random cold cases they come to a discovery that the cases they’re individually investigating may be in fact related and connected to something even bigger than they could have ever anticipated,


Where does it take place? Set in Paris, France this isn’t your romantic “City of Lights”. Instead Sophie Hénaff’s book allows readers to see the more realistic side of the City that just like any other major city has its own issues and problems, including corruption and crime.

Why did I like it? The Awkward Squad features a mishmash of misfit characters. I loved how they were all able to come together in the end as a team to cleverly take down the murderer who was someone with a lot of influence and power. I especially liked the dynamic between unapologetic, and crass Rosière and rule-biding Lebreton as well as the unique partnership between Anne Capestan and Torrez, who has a reputation for bringing bad luck to those working closely with him. I loved how Capestan ignored the superstition and trusted Torrez to be her partner in the investigation, as this ended up saving her. With a wacky cast of characters The Awkward Squad had a great deal of potential. However, I felt that the book had too many storylines and characters and with all the jumping around it made it difficult to keep track of who’s who and what’s really going on. So while the ending of The Awkward Squad leaves plenty of room open for future stories, I’m not sure I will continue with this series.

When did it come out? April 3, 2018

 

 

 

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Midweek Mini Reviews #17


This Midweek Mini Reviews post features two of the books I brought with me on my trip to Vietnam this summer.

Vi by Kim Thúy

What I loved most about Vi was how family was truly the focus of the story this time around. Readers learn about the title character’s family history (starting with her grandparents) well before we get to Vi’s story and even after she goes out on her own, her family continues to have an impact on her life. I also appreciated the fact that another one of the central aspects of this novel was the Vietnamese Canadian immigrant experience which does differ from the experiences of Vietnamese Americans. I also fell in love with Vi’s family, including her brothers who all looked out for her in their own way as well as her mother who “gave” Vi to her friend, Hà to raise so that she can have a better education and future. As a result of this upbringing, Vi is able to have many adventures across the globe which I loved reading about. All that being said, however, I felt that Vi was not as well written compared with Thúy’s earlier novels, Ru and Mãn and the ending left much to be desired. Furthermore, despite being the titular character readers barely get to know Vi before the book ends. In the end, Vi was a decent read as it has Thúy’s trademark stripped-down, exquisite prose, however the lack of lightness in Vi’s story a

Lands of Lost Borders: Out of Bounds on the Silk Road by Kate Harris

Lands of Lost Borders is a memoir that details the journey and life of the author Kate Harris. Harris has always dreamt of being an explorer and it was interesting to read about how she discovered and harnessed her writing talents to get funding for her adventures as a student. That being said, this was a slow and tough read for me because felt long-winded at times with all the history lessons and technical details of biking embedded in the book. I would’ve liked there to have been more on her adventure in present day, including greater details on the characters she came across and the cities and towns she and her friend travelled through. I did, however, appreciated the fact that Harris doesn’t gloss over the difficulties of her journey as they do face many challenges along the way. So as far as travel literature goes, Lands of Lost Borders isn’t high on my favourites or recommend reading list, however I did learn about Central and Western Asia from it. In the end, I think I probably would have been better off with an audiobook for this one given the type of story it was. 

 

 

 

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Midweek Mini Reviews #16


This Midweek Mini Reviews post features some  non-fiction books for those who are feeling a bit lost in life.

Can’t Help Myself: Lessons & Confessions from a Modern Advice Columnist by Meredith Goldstein

I’ve always liked reading advice columns in magazines and newspapers so I was keen to pick up Meredith Goldstein’s Can’t Help Myself: Lessons & Confessions from a Modern Advice Columnist as it promised a “behind the scenes” look at one of today’s most popular columns. Unlike your typical advice column, Love Letters is unique in that it allows responses from its readers in the comments section which gives it a more modern, “group therapy” vibe. The book is divided into different sections, each starting with an introduction from Goldstein talking about her personal life and experience. This “memoir” aspect of the book is then followed by one or two questions from her column that fall under the section’s topic along with Goldstein’s response and some of the responses from the comments. I loved seeing the comments from the readers as their responses and suggestions were always entertaining and occasionally extremely hilarious. I enjoyed this refreshingly, honest look at an advice column and am looking forward to checking out the actual Love Letters column online.

Nobody Cares: Essays by Anne T. Donahue

While the first few essays in Anne T. Donahue’s Nobody Cares truly resonated with me, the majority of the essays in this collection did not. However, there were a few that stood out to me. The chief among them is the essay on not being “fun” as I hate or at the very least don’t see the appeal of the popular things she also hates although I do love brunch. Still, I loved that the takeaway was about not doing things you don’t want to anymore, thus giving you permission to not force yourself to do the things you hate, this is something I’m definitely a fan of it. The other essay that stood out to me was her essay on death titled, “It Will Never Feel This bad Again” as not only was it extremely poignant but it was probably the most honest and relatable essay about death I’ve read so far. In the end, if you’re in your 20s or 30s and feeling lost or not liking where you are in life this book will definitely speak to you. Whether it’s by providing advice that needs to be repeated for you to follow like she does in her essay “Get to Work” or being straightforward and blunt with you while oddly also being comforting as seen in her essay titled, “In Case of Emergency”, Donahue truly cements her status of the best friend you would want to have in your corner.

 

 

 

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Mystery Monday | A Death of No Importance by Mariah Fredericks

Mystery Mondays

Mystery Mondays is an occasional review feature here on Words of Mystery that showcases books in the mystery (and on occasion thriller) genre that we are currently reading and our thoughts on them. Feel free to comment and leave suggestions as to what we should read and review next.

Who is it by? Mariah Fredericks is an American author who lives in New York. She has written many YA novels, A Death of No Importance is her foray into the mystery genre.

What is it about? Jane Prescott, is a ladies’ maid in an upper-class 1910 household in New York City. Being a servant means that she has mastered the ability of being “unseen” unless called upon. This skill along with her sharp, observant mind comes in handy when the fiancé of the lady she serves is murdered followed by the lady herself!

Where does it take place? A Death of No Importance is set in New York City during the Gilded Age.

Why did I pick it?  I’ve been trying to get back into mysteries and Mariah Fredericks’ A Death of No Importance sounded like an intriguing read due to its protagonist being a lady’s maid to a predominant family in 1910. These kinds of stories told from the servants’ perspectives are always interesting as due to the nature of their jobs, they are usually the ones privy to family secrets and have access to these families that no one else has. Immediately upon reading this book I was drawn in. The author does an excellent job of setting up the scene and a great amount of attention is paid to even the tiniest details which truly enhances the storytelling. The case itself is an interesting one, although I wished that we got more insight into the playboy Norrie as well as his “relationships” with Charlotte Benchley (who the protagonist, Jane works for) and Beatrice Tyler, the woman whom Norrie was supposed to be engaged. It felt like this juicy aspect of the murder mystery was quickly brushed under the rug in favour of the reveal of the murderer’s identity which I found a bit disappointing. Even so, A Death of No Importance was an excellent read that fan of historical fiction and cozy mysteries would enjoy. If there are more books featuring Jane Prescott solving mysteries, I definitely wouldn’t be opposed to picking them up.

When is it out? April 10th 2018

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.