Book Review | How To Stop Time by Matt Haig

Authour:
Matt Haig
Format:
ARC
Publication date:
February 6th 2018
Publisher:
HarperAvenue
Publisher Social Media: Twitter/Facebook/SavvyReader/
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:
I had the pleasure of meeting Matt Haig two years ago at an event for his book, A Boy Called Christmas which I loved. It was at this event where I first heard about How to Stop Time which he was still working on at the time. The concept of a person not aging on the outside and slowly aging on the inside had me intrigued. However, I had completely forgotten about the book until earlier this year when I saw it on the Savvy Reader’s “Most Anticipated Reads of (Early) 2018” blog post.

The protagonist of How to Stop Time is a man named Tom Hazard, a man who suffers from a condition called “anageria” which makes him appear like he’s in his forties when he is actually over 400 years old. From the first page, Haig’s whimsical writing draws you in, as it feels as if Tom is speaking to you directly. I’m not usually a fan of science fiction, but somehow Haig makes the story work in a manner that was kept me turning the page as Tom’s story is one that would resonate with anyone who is human.

More than just another science fiction book about time, How to Stop Time is a story about love (both of a romantic and familial nature) and what it means to be human. As we follow Tom’s narrative both in the present time and in his past, we come to realize that at their core humans have both changed and remained the same. And that for a person who has been alive for so long, there truly is a difference is between just “existing” throughout time and choosing to live your life in the present.

Despite the pacing being a bit off at times, and the conclusion of the major threat in the book being anti-climactic I still found How to Stop Time to be a profound and remarkable read. And as the film rights for this book have been bought, I look forward to seeing how this incredible book will be translated onto the sliver screen.

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

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Book Review | The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore by Kim Fu

Authour:
Kim Fu
Format:
ARC
Publication date:
February 13th 2018
Publisher:
Harpercollins
Publisher Social Media: 
Twitter/Facebook/SavvyReader/
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:
Based off of the synopsis and the marketing, Kim Fu’s The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore was an unexpected and surprising read for me. For instance, I was not expecting the book to be structured as five (one for each of the girls) self-contained short stories that made references to the traumatic incident at the camp they girls attended. Additionally, while each of the stories was well-written and engrossing I found them rather melancholy to the point of depressing in a few of the stories. 

Despite being told in a nonlinear manner, it was not too difficult to follow each of the girls’ stories. The story was refreshingly realistic in showing how the majority of the girls have no contact with each other after they leave the camp. To be fair, they were not best friends before the incident, but the incident truly did scatter them both physically and emotionally afterward. On the other hand, I appreciated the fact that at least Isabel and Dina kept in touch and remained connected as it’s tough to have gone through something as traumatic as the girls did without having anyone who can understand. This is evident in how despite appearing fine on the surface, a second look at how the other girls’ lives turned out will show that they still bear the mental scars from the incident.

From what I heard about The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore, I was kind of expecting there to be more to the camp ‘incident” in addition how the girls over the years cope with the trauma. Instead, readers only receive brief snippets of each of the girls’ lives. The result is that while readers see just how flawed each of the girls are, the time spent with each girl is too brief. Just as readers become invested in one girl, her story abruptly ends and the book moves onto the next girl. 

Despite not being the most satisfying read, The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore remains a quiet but emotionally powerful read that will probably stay with its readers indefinitely. 

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | Things to Do When It’s Raining by Marissa Stapley

Authour:
Marissa Stapley
Format:
eGalley
Publication date:
February 6th 2018
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster Canada
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:
Marissa Stapley’s debut, Mating for Life was an interesting read and after being asked to do the cover reveal for Things To Do When It’s Raining I was excited for her latest book. Recommended for fans of Nicholas Sparks, I can definitely understand the appeal of Things To Do When It’s Raining. After all, there are childhood sweethearts, forbidden love and of course families complicated by secrets.

However, the romance isn’t the main focus of Things To Do When It’s Raining. Instead, told from various perspectives, readers receive all sorts of hints regarding the complicated family history of both Mae and Gabe. And while the stories are compelling, the various chapters felt a bit jumbled up and confusing after some time. Understandably, although this may be due to both Lilly and George’s old age and deteriorating state of mind it made it difficult to connect with either of their stories. As for Mae and Gabe, I adored their relationship and wished it received more time, especially since the epilogue glosses over what could’ve been a compelling story of how their relationship evolved over time.

Stapley’s writing as always is incredibly vivid and descriptive and it’s always refreshing to witness her approach serious topics in a realistic and occasionally heartbreaking way in her books. I also love the quirkiness that is infused into the story, for example, in Things To Do When It’s Raining each chapter starts with a suggestion of actual activities the characters can do on days where it’s raining making it an amusing nod to the title of the book.

Things To Do When It’s Raining is a quick read, however, I personally felt that I was given an abundance of little clues and details that did not truly add up to anything conclusive. In the end, it felt truly like nothing happened or was revealed despite the massive information overload. And while this made it the story more true to reality, it felt unsatisfying to me. Nevertheless, Things To Do When It’s Raining is well-written and would make for an excellent cozy read.

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Midweek Mini Reviews #12

  
The Real Thing by Melissa Foster

I’m fairly new to the adult romance genre, and after reading a few that I adored I got a blogger friend of mine to give me some recommendations. On her list of recommendations for romances that are more rom-com was Melissa Foster’s The Real Thing. This was my first Melissa Foster book and I absolutely loved it! I’m so glad I decided to pick up this one as one of my first picks. The Real Thing takes place in a small town called Sugar Lake and features Zane and Willow who have a somewhat complicated history. I loved that they technically started out as friends and kept in touch all those years before getting together as it just made their chemistry and relationship all the more steamier and swoonier. And while the fake relationship trope was used in this book, I found it refreshing that the book did not focus on the angst of the scenario. Instead the two managed to have a relatively healthy relationship despite how they first get together. It was also refreshing to see a couple directly address their issues and problems and not take forever to dwell on their conflict and let things fester. A light and fluffy rom-com, The Real Thing has me adding another romance series on to my TBR list. Since the author has stated that there will be books for each of Willow’s siblings, I’m looking forward to the next one which features Bridgette in addition to the ones that will inevitably focus on the pairings of Ben and Aurelia and Piper and Harley as I’m not ready to say goodbye to all these characters for good.

Unconditionally by Erin Lyon

I did enjoy Erin Lyon’s I Love You Subject to the Following Terms and Conditions, however the cliff-hanger ending was killer! Especially since I went into the book not realizing it was only the first book of a duology. Unconditionally picks up almost immediately after the events of I Love You Subject to the Following Terms and Conditions. Things are finally picking up for Kate, she’s now has a new place and a job that she’s finding she doesn’t hate. I loved how chaos and hilarity follows Kate especially at work where she somehow always gets the most “interesting” cases and clients. Unconditionally was every bit, if not more enjoyable than I Love You Subject to the Following Terms and Conditions. And while there are times where the characters, especially Kate come off as superficial, and shallow this just added to the entertainment, and escapism element of the novel. Even with its incredibly satisfying conclusion, I can’t help but want a continuation of the Contract Killers series if only for more of Kate, Adam and their group of friends.

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

 

Book Review | American Panda by Gloria Chao

Authour:
Gloria Chao
Format:
eGalley
Publication date:
February 6th 2018
Publisher:
Simon Pulse
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:
I’m truly enjoying the rise in diverse YA fiction voices. This is coming from a girl who grew up with little exposure to stories starring Asian characters. I remember getting excited when on the rare occasion a required reading in class was a short story by an Asian writer with Asian characters that I could relate to. American Panda is the latest addition to the own voices, narrative trend which I hope is here to stay.

While I went into American Panda under the false assumption that it would be a light, rom-com similar to Sandhya Menon’s When Dimple Met Rishi, so I was a bit caught off guard by the serious nature of the book especially in the beginning. Yes, there are a few moments of adorableness between Mei and her love interest, Darren Takahashi, however this comes later in the novel and is far from being the central focus. Instead, American Panda is about complicated parent-child dynamics, and the struggle to be true to yourself and your passions.

I can definitely relate to Mei’s pressure to not let her parents down while trying to stay true to what makes her happy. My own immigrant parents never pressured me or my siblings to be doctors, however they have made it clear that they want us to have a stable life without the hardships that they faced. And that’s what I loved the most about American Panda, it realistically showcases one example of how traditional Asian families act. Sure, my parents would never even threaten to disown any of us, however they do gossip and compare us to other kids while giving us backhand comments as a way to show that they care. I also found it refreshing how the family issues were not glossed over. By the novel’s conclusion the family conflicts are not all resolved in a neat and tidy way (as is the case in real life), instead progress is gradually being made from both sides. After all, people can’t just change on a whim, it takes time and considerable work in order to reach an understanding.

What’s nice about the rise in own voices trend is we are getting stories, especially geared towards a YA audience that we haven’t gotten before, I do not think I’ve ever read a story similar to American Panda and while I can’t relate to all of Mei’s experiences I know people who have had similar experiences. Furthermore, as a child of Asian immigrants, growing up as a minority among Caucasians who had younger parents with laissez-faire parenting styles, it was difficult for me to explain to others how I did not have the same freedom that was afforded to them. While it was fine for them to rebel and do as they pleased, similar to Mei in the book, growing up I couldn’t just do as I please without the massive guilt trips. Heartbreaking yet heartwarming, lovely, and well written American Panda is a perfect read to inspire and encourage Asian teens by showing them that there isn’t just one path that they must follow in life.

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | The Amazing Story of the Man Who Cycled from India to Europe for Love by Per J. Andersson

Authour:
Per J. Andersson
Format:
Hardcover
Publication date:
March 14th 2017
Publisher:
Oneworld Publications
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:

The astrologer returned to tell my fortune. He took a sharpened stick and scratched my future on a palm leaf. ‘He will marry a girl from far, far way, from outside the village, the district, the province, the state and even the country,’ it began.

I love an interesting travel story, and even more so if it’s a love story. That being said, Per J. Andersson’s The Amazing Story of the Man Who Cycled from India to Europe for Love is remarkable in how little of the central love story is shown.

Now don’t get me wrong, it was incredibly fascinating learning about India’s complicated history with its caste system. Furthermore, I appreciated how uncensored the book was in illustrating the hardships of those born into the Dalit aka “untouchable” caste and just how corruption and discrimination based on caste remains prevalent even with all the new laws and regulations today..

While both PK and Lotta are characters in the so-called “love story”, The Amazing Story of the Man Who Cycled from India to Europe for Love truly is the story of P.K., the titular “man”. The book is told in a way that is similar to a documentary where we follow P.K’s life from birth to his days as a struggling student and artist who is eventually “discovered” by some influential figures to when he meets Lotta. Unfortunately we do not get much insight into why or how they fall in love with one another.

While not the ultimate love story, The Amazing Story of the Man Who Cycled from India to Europe for Love is astonishing in that showcases the power of one extremely fortunate man’s perseverance in addition to showing readers just how kind strangers can be to one another especially travellers. Well-written despite the overuse of exposition, The Amazing Story of the Man Who Cycled from India to Europe for Love while not a book for everyone may be enjoyed by those intrigued by the class structure and distinctions in India.

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | The Milk Lady of Bangalore by Shoba Narayan

Format:
ARC
Publication date:
January 23rd 2018
Publisher:
Algonquin Books
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:
If you’ve been to my blog before, you’d probably know that I’m a immense fan of nonfiction that have a travel aspect to them. Shoba Narayan’s latest book, The Milk Lady of Bangalore: An Unexpected Adventure is an interesting twist on the usual “travel” story as it’s partly about her experience living with her family as expats (of sorts) in India. I say “of sorts” because while she and her husband actually were born and raised in India, her two daughters were not. Instead they were born in the USA, and part of the reason that Shoba and her husband decided to move back to India was to give their girls the chance to truly get to know their grandparents and family in India before it was too late.

I started this review talking about the author and her family and their move, but The Milk Lady of Bangalore is at its core truly a book about the history, economy and religion of India. Using the “cow” as a “lens” the author dissects Indian society and culture and the reason why an ordinary (to us Westerners) animal  is still so revered in India. I definitely learned a great deal about what life is like for those actually living in India in addition to the communities that are formed in a country that’s still more collectivist than it is individualistic. Furthermore, it was incredibly fascinating to read about all the beliefs and rituals surrounding cows in India which while rapidly becoming more modern still holds on tight to numerous ideologies and superstitions that are connected to the country’s agricultural history.

The Milk Lady of Bangalore: An Unexpected Adventure teaches us readers that we should appreciate what we are fortunate to have. In writing The Milk Lady of Bangalore, Shoba also shows how just by investing in one person you can end up making an enormous difference for several more people. The times are without a doubt changing, but what remains the same is the concept of life and death and if you are able to help just one person and bond with them thereupon making everything all the more sweeter.

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Waiting on Wednesday #25 | My So-Called Bollywood Life by Nisha Sharma

wed Waiting on Wednesday is a weekly meme that highlights upcoming titles that we’re looking forward to/dying to read. It is hosted by Jill at Breaking the Spine

Synopsis:

Winnie Mehta was never really convinced that Raj was her soulmate, but their love was written in the stars. Literally, a pandit predicted Winnie would find the love of her life before her 18th birthday, and Raj meets all of the qualifications. Which is why Winnie is shocked to return from her summer at film camp to find her boyfriend of three years hooking up with Jenny Dickens. Worse, Raj is crowned chair of the student film festival, a spot Winnie was counting on for her film school applications. As a self-proclaimed Bollywood expert, Winnie knows this is not how her perfect ending is scripted.

Then there’s Dev, a fellow film geek, and one of the few people Winnie can count on to help her reclaim control of her story. Dev is smart charming, and challenges Winnie to look beyond her horoscope to find someone she’d pick for herself. But does falling for Dev mean giving up on her prophecy, and her chance to live happily ever after? To get her Bollywood-like life on track, Winnie will need a little bit of help from fate, family, and of course, a Bollywood movie star.

Like an expertly choreographed Bollywood dance scene, Nisha Sharma’s off-beat love story dazzles in the lime light.

One of my first forays into diverse YA romances was Sandhya Menon’s When Dimple Met Rishi which I adored! I’m not sure why, but I’ve always been a fan of South Asian culture and of course Bollywood. I love how the synopsis of My So-Called Bollywood Life hints at the idea of “fate”, and how things that are pre-determined don’t always work out the way we want. Having been pushed back from its original release to May 2018, I can’t wait to finally be able to read this fun, and modern take on the Bollywood love story!

What books are you “waiting” on this week?

Book Review | Busted by Gina Ciocca

Authour:
Gina Ciocca
Format:
ARC
Publication date:
January 1st 2018
Publisher:
Sourcebooks Fire

Review:
As mentioned in an earlier post, Gina Ciocca’s Busted was my most anticipated YA title from the Raincoast Teen Reads Preview back in September. Fortunately I was able to snag an ARC of it last year.

The synopsis of Busted somehow had me thinking that it was going to be light, fluffy read where the girl falls for her “mark”. However, in reality it was far from an adorable read though what do you expect when a book is compared to the show, Veronica Mars? Still, there wasn’t much actual investigating either, which made Busted and interesting novel that was somewhere between your lighter contemporary YA fare and a YA thriller.

Personally I felt that overall the novel is well balanced as it was overall a gripping read that was neither too light or too dark. My favourite thing about Busted is actually the characters, and their relationships. And by relationships I don’t necessarily mean the romantic ones which honestly weren’t that well-developed. Instead the friendships and sinking relationships felt more fleshed out. Marisa, herself is definitely a relatable character in that she’s geeky and quirky yet down to earth and doesn’t take any crap from those in her life. I loved that her brother was her occasional albeit reluctant accomplice and that he wasn’t her best friend or her enemy, which I found to be a fairly realistic portrayal of the brother-sister dynamic in real life. I also enjoyed the portrayal of female friendships and how the book showed how people remain friends even if they don’t go to the same school. Also, I admired how the friendships had several layers, and that Charlie and Marisa weren’t just about blindly and superficially supporting everything the other does.

Busted was not as fluffy as I thought it would be, however I still found it mostly enjoyable. Recommended for those who like a quick read with a bit of high school drama, a pinch of darkness, and a dash of romance.

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Mystery Monday | The Imam of Tawi-Tawi (Ava Lee #10) by Ian Hamilton

Mystery Mondays

Mystery Mondays is an occasional review feature here on Words of Mystery that showcases books in the mystery (and on occasion thriller) genre that we are currently reading and our thoughts on them. Feel free to comment and leave suggestions as to what we should read and review next.

Who is it by? Ian Hamilton, a Canadian authour of the now 10 novels in the Ava Lee series. His Ava Lee series has recently been green lit to be adapted into a TV series by the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation).

What is it about? As a favour to her late mentor’s friend, Ave finds herself headed to the Philippines to assist “Uncle” Chang with a problem one of his business partner is facing. What she discovers will force her to pull her skills and connections to limits greater than she’s ever had to be before.

Where does it take place? As the title suggests this book is set mainly in Tawi-Tawi, an island province in the Philippines, that borders both Malaysia and Indonesia. It is known for its majority Muslism population which plays a central role in the novel.

Why did I like it? I love the Ava Lee series, and always anticipate the next book in the series every year. What I particularly enjoyed about this book was the fact that similar to the other books in the series, The Imam of Tawi-Tawi addresses topics and issues that are current and therefore relevant. The book poses an interesting question to both Ava and the reader as to what is the “right” course of action and whether extreme (and twisted) means are ever justified to achieve an end goal. Before going into this book I was not quite familiar with the political climate in the Philippines, therefore I found it fascinating that it plays a prominent role in this book. While The Imam of Tawi-Tawi has less action than the earlier books in the series, there were several twists and turns that helped to get me hooked. I also did enjoy the investigation aspect of the novel in addition to all the travel that Ava gets to do. The Imam of Tawi-Tawi is another strong addition to what is becoming one of my go to mystery series, and based on the excerpt provided I cannot wait for the next book in the series!

When is it out? January 6, 2018

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Midweek Mini Reviews #11

  
Six Degrees of Freedom by Nicolas Dickner, Lazer Lederhendler

Six Degrees of Freedom follow Lisa, Éric and Jay over many years. And while Lisa and Éric are childhood friends, Jay is more of an outsider and is only connected to them because of their “experiments” and her work with the RCMP.

To be honest, this book just wasn’t my cup of tea. While the chapters are indeed brief the book is incredibly slow-paced. I felt that the author took a too much time just to get to the main plot which was the most interesting aspect of this book and unfortunately it did not unfold until the very last chapters of the book. Instead the majority of the book was devoted to the technical elements of the shipping and container industry in addition to the backgrounds of not just the three protagonists but also to the backgrounds of everyone they interact with.

I wasn’t sure what to expect from Nicolas Dickner’s Six Degrees of Freedom because its synopsis did have me intrigued. However, the execution of the story didn’t do the story justice in my opinion. Lisa, Jay and Éric did have the potential to be compelling characters, however there just wasn’t enough time devoted to their development or to let the reader care about them which made for a rather dreary and long-winded read despite not being a thick book.

The Four Tendencies: The Indispensable Personality Profiles That Reveal How to Make Your Life Better (and Other People’s Lives Better, Too) by Gretchen Rubin

Maybe it’s my psychology background, but lately I’ve been really getting into personality dimensions. I’ve taken Gallup’s StrengthsFinder assessment and my current workplace is obsessed with the Colours Personality Dimensions so I thought it would interesting to read up and learn about the Four Tendencies personality framework. Like Gretchen Rubin’s other books The Four Tendencies is laid out in a way that makes an otherwise complex and intimidating topic more accessible to the everyday reader. The design of the book is also visually appealing and the book has a quiz at the beginning for those who are curious to find out which of the four “tendencies” they are. In addition, there are lots of personal and practical examples that help the reader to understand each tendency better and know how to deal with people from the four tendency types. The Four Tendencies is a great read that is perfect for those who work in a team, parents, people who deal with clients and customers and even those who just want to bring the best in themselves and others. I definitely agree that the more you know about yourself and those around you, the better equipped you are to be more productive and even happy.

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

 

Book Review | Single Girl Problems: Why Being Single Isn’t a Problem to Be Solved by Andrea Bain

Format:
eGalley
Publication date:
January 13th 2018
Publisher:
Dundurn
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:
I’m not going to lie, I was beyond excited for Andrea Bain’s Single Girl Problems: Why Being Single Isn’t a Problem to Be Solved and I was disappointed when the release date was pushed back from its original November release date. Fortunately I was able to acquire an eGalley a few months early for me to read and review on my blog.

I’m familiar with Andrea Bain from her current role as one of the co-hosts of the CBC show The Goods and I was interested in seeing how her amusing on-screen personality translated onto the written page. Additionally, Single Girl Problems promised me a realistic and refreshing new perspective on what it means to be a single woman in the 21st century. After all, there are countless books on how to find and keep the “one” compared to the few books that focus almost exclusively on the single woman.

Right from the introduction Single Girl Problems spoke to me, especially the sections where Bain discusses the stigma associated with being unattached after a certain age while being surrounded by couples. I loved that the main message was for the majority about embracing your singledom. That being said, this is still a relationship book and the underlying message remains that one should be at least open to the idea of having a relationship. While this is something I could not necessarily get on board with, I did appreciate the overall positive and modern approach of Single Girl Problems. Thus, while I would’ve liked for the book to touch a bit more on the concept of just being single and not having to need a relationship it was still a relatable and entertaining read. With a perfect balance of research and Hollywood/pop culture references Single Girl Problems is more than just your run of the mill self-help book.

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Book Review | Meet Cute: Some People Are Destined to Meet

Format:
ARC
Publication date:
January 2nd 2018
Publisher:

HMH Books for Young Readers
Source:
Received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Review:
Back in May during the Raincoast TeenReads Fall 2017 Preview, Meet Cute: Some People Are Destined to Meet was the top title on my review book wish list. Even before the preview, when I first found out about this book I knew that it would automatically be on my must read list. After all YA Contemporary fiction is (probably) my favourite genre to read, and several of my favourite authors like Emery Lord, Nicola Yoon and Katharine McGee contributed to this collection of stories about fateful “meetings”.

Typically in short story collections, there’s at least one story that I’m not sold on, however, with Meet Cute I found that even if I did not love the story there was always some aspect of each of the stories that I enjoyed. Some of the more memorable stores were Emery Lord’s Oomph which features a meet cute between two girls in an airport, Jennifer L. Armentrout’s The Dictionary of You and Me and Click by Katherine McGee. However, my favourite of them is Julie Murphy’s Something Real as it was such an adorable and fun take on the  usual reality show competition.

For those of you looking for diversity in characters and stories, Meet Cute: Some People Are Destined to Meet is definitely a short story collection that you need to pick up. While all the stories in this collection are technically “love stories” they vary in genre and structure. And it was refreshing to discover that they weren’t all insta-love and happily ever after stories, in fact the majority of them were fairly realistic. If you enjoy adorable stories, then Meet Cute is for you as there is something for everyone as long as that person is someone who can appreciate an adorable first meeting between characters.

Regardless of how this book came into my possession, the above review consists of my honest opinion of the book and my opinion only.

Holiday Blog Hiatus

It’s that time of the year again! In preparation for the next busy upcoming weeks, Words of Mystery will once again be going on hiatus for the month of December. The blog will be back with new blog posts again the second week of January! In the meantime I’ll continue to be active on social media. Finally, I just realized that this blog is almost four years old!! I’ve come a long way since I first started blogging, and really couldn’t have gotten to do all the things I’ve done without all of you who read, and support my blog, so thank you from the bottom of my heart.  I hope you guys will join me once again in the new year. Until then, I wish you a happy holiday season.

A sneak peek at some of the books that will be featured on the blog in 2018.